40' Australian Work Boat needs aft cabin refit!

Discussion in 'Downeast Boat NEWBIES' started by Kit_L, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. Kit_L

    Kit_L Member

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    Hello there,

    Kit_L from Greenwell Point, Australia, here. I have put a deposit on an ex-AWB (probably a Navy one, not an Army one) and the remainder after slipping in October for some pre-arranged hull work, and anti-foul. Where we live, all wooden boats are pulled every six months for cleaning and anti-fouling.

    This is Coral Queen; could not get back far enough on the dock to get her all in, in one shot (phone only today). CQ is a famous tuna fishing (pole and line) boat in this region. She is 40', full-displacement hull, 5' draft, weighs ~11 tons, and is rated to carry 12 tons. She is oregon planks on Australian hardwood frames, and is fitted with a sweet-running Gardner 6LW (84 hp @ 1,300 rpm), and currently holds 750 litres of diesel in twin, connected tanks fitted amidships. She has had additional planking above the original deck and substantial scuppers aft between the new planking and the deck. What is the technical term for this planking, BTW, please?

    A friend over at Trawler Forum suggested I post here, because of her similarity to DE lobster/fishing boats, but she is an earlier vintage than most of the boats I have seen here, so far, and she's definitely not a semi-displacement hull like most of the DEs I have seen! AFAIK, she was build in 1946, but that is to be confirmed once I find her build plate.

    Her instrumentation is basic (CRT chart-plotter and sounder), good magnetic compass, 27MHz radio, and hydraulic steering and autopilot. I will be fitting a new chart-plotter.

    The third image shows an original AWB.

    After completing the deal in mid-October, I want to pull the current fish well and two live bait tanks, and fit a low-profile aft cabin, for a single berth, chart-table and seats on one side, and decent galley on the other, and a composting head in the bow (twin V-berths presently). I want a shower, deck level behind the wheel-house too, eventually. The wheel-house will have a second berth. The current aft-deck setup can be seen in the fourth image.

    She uses 5–6 l/hour at 6kn, at 1,200 rpm. She is sea-kindly, has great heavy weather capacity and no stabilisation. She probably never will! She is about as basic and functional as most work boats are in this area, and they go out in all weather.

    I will be refitting to current finish standards; i.e., work boat finish! Her windows are perspex; wheel house is wood, and matte paint the finish above the waterline; non-slip paint on the decks. I know this is very different to most boats here, but perfectly fitting her past. She has been to Papua New Guinea at least once, so far; she is not a show boat, that's for sure.

    More images to come. All help with suggestions for the refit post October will be very appreciated. TIA
    . IMG_1.JPG IMG_2.JPG AWB401_DavidGlasson_2012_2.jpg IMG_3.JPG IMG_1.JPG IMG_2.JPG AWB401_DavidGlasson_2012_2.jpg IMG_3.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
    Bill, Keelboater, Samp and 3 others like this.
  2. Shor2832

    Shor2832 Senior Member

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    Welcome - congrats on your purchase.
     
  3. Kit_L

    Kit_L Member

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    Thank you; I have been reading all night here, so far. Much more to come.
     
  4. LadyMaureen

    LadyMaureen Captain

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    Bad ass boat. Welcome aboard.
     
  5. Old Mud

    Old Mud Captain

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    Hey, a Real workboat !! I like it. I think what your looking for is an "Over Deck" . Are you going to run the house aft ? Oh yeah, Welcome aboard.
     
  6. traditions

    traditions Captain

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    She's been Decked Over, and a waist added , some would call it a buffalo waist.
     
  7. Dr Dude

    Dr Dude Captain

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    Great looking, no BS boat ....Good luck with her and keep up the posts ...please .....
     
  8. Kit_L

    Kit_L Member

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    Thanks for the welcomes, everyone!

    I intend to remove her fish well (runs the whole width of the hull up to the foot or so of original deck) and live bait tanks which fill the same width, and fit the lowest-profile aft cabin I can, while leaving a decent about of rear deck space. So, putting this another way, the after cabin will be sunk into the space that the well and tanks presently occupy. I could continue the wheelhouse back, at the same level, and move the tank fillers, but I'd prefer to have the aft cabin as low as possible, to keep weight low (last thing I want to do is change her see-keeping capacity) and to minimise windage (is that what you call it here? or do you use 'freeboard'?). I mean I want to reduce side area to a minimum, because the other name of Greenwell Point is "Windy Point".

    So, I am not sure of the technical term for that kind of sunken aft cabin, but that's what I want at present.

    You will see from the image of the original AWB that the whole of what is presently my well and tanks was once open, with a sole ~3' below the current deck height. This is the space/depth I want to use for the cabin.

    When I get back home I will post some images from the AWB register site, which show how these boats were originally constructed, from the ribs up, and how they looked when planked, so you can see the under-deck construction.
     
  9. ben2go

    ben2go Member

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    Nice boat and welcome to the forum.
     
    Kit_L likes this.
  10. Kit_L

    Kit_L Member

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    Here's the original hull/cockpit/wheelhouse arrangement:

    ArmyWorkboats_Construction_GM-H_Melbourne_DonRoberts.jpg
    (Thanks to AWB register, 40' Army Workboats)

    You can see exactly where CQ has been decked over, and hence locating the live bait tanks and large fish well. I love the amidships bollards!

    Comparing with CQ, with her added gunnels and cap rail, you can see where some of her seaworthiness comes from: much less water over the deck, and any water over the read desk drains in seconds, due to the huge scuppers (2" gap between gunnels and deck from amidships back).

    The biggest question in my mind, before I take delivery and pull the fish wells, is how much to extend the wheelhouse and whether to locate the galley in the wheelhouse (thinking cooking odours and ventilation, mainly) and having the rear cabin as living space (two seats with table in between, freezer and fridge, settee opposite and one berth behind steps down from wheelhouse).

    I am thinking this way because there's an 8KVA Sea Wasp genset in the engine room that my mechanic friend is sure he can fix. It has 3-phase power, but I am not sure this is necessary—but are there any disadvantages to having it if it's there, and wiring for it there too?

    I want substantial solar-battery power as well; that wheelhouse roof is crying out for two decent panels. With a 3,000W inverter, I am thinking I will only need the genset at times, and will not need it if moored somewhere quiet.

    Does anyone have any suggestions re. books or plans for this sort of refit? I have basic carpentry skills (up to her current standard!) and can get skilled help on anything mechanical or electrical when required. I am thinking that 18mm marine ply will be an ideal building material; haven't decided on the framing timber you, but there is a huge variety available here.

    All suggestions welcome.
     
  11. Keelboater

    Keelboater Captain

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    This boat is a classic with character! Good luck with your project and be sure to keep us updated.
     
  12. goin4broke

    goin4broke Captain

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    Hello Kit_L and welcome aboard. Interesting find you have there. In response to your question about the three phase generator I guess my first thought would be if there was anything aboard the actually requires three phase you plan on keeping.

    I'm not familiar with austrailian wiring configurations but here in the US standard three phase is 120/208 volts. If you added a 240 volt air conditioner it would usually be compatible with 208 volts. But as you are considering adding solar and and inverter it might be wise to keep everything the same voltage.
     
  13. Kit_L

    Kit_L Member

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    Hello there, GfB,

    3-phase down-under is 400V, 50Hz. Standard household voltage, or single phase, in Australia used to be 240V, 50Hz, but is now 230V, 50Hz.

    There is nothing on the boat now that requires this, and while the current Sea Wasp's engine allegedly runs perfectly, the generator failed many years ago. I do have a mate who is familiar with these and he says it's an easy fix. The current 3-phase generator was used to cool the fish tank, and is the standard generator in these waters. I will not need 3-phase for anything. I don't need an air-conditioner (I tell myself; the Admiral will no doubt weigh in on that front when the time comes), but definitely do want an oven and, if going with an electric oven, then an induction stove top just makes sense and is so easy to clean. My early research suggests a peak load of 4,000W maximum.

    I am inclined to wait until we take delivery, and make a decision when we have thought the whole project through. Every time I go down to the boat (docked very close to where I live) I see new opportunities. There is a huge area on the pilot house for solar panels; an extra alternator could be run from the Gardner for redundancy, and the Latronics toroidal transformer inverters we favour are made here. Much to think about.

    GfB, I see you are an electrician. I can see why a boat with US 3-phase power would be a plus to anyone running an air-conditioner, but given that a standard household circuit here is 230V at 10amps, is there any need to run more than that on a boat that's not fishing professionally, do you think? Thanks so much for posting, too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2018

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