Seaway 24 Hardtop sport

Discussion in '"Pocket" Downeast Boats (14-24ft)' started by Shark49, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. Shark49

    Shark49 Member

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    I have been looking at this boat and really think it fits my needs. The only question is how it is in rough seas. I currently fish Watch Hill RI out to a few miles past Block Island RI in a 20 foot WA cruising 20 knots in winds under 10 knots and seas under 3 foot chop, if it’s going to be more then that I stay around Watch Hill rather then run to Block.
    How’s this thing run?
     
  2. Blitzen

    Blitzen Captain

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    20 Foot WA what? Deep V hull? What is it that you are used to cruising in?
     
  3. Blitzen

    Blitzen Captain

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    Boats and how they ride are a matter of perspective so it really helps to know what it is that you are use to.
     
  4. novivin

    novivin Senior Member

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    If you want to go fast and get soaked go deep v, if you want to go fast and stay dry go deep v with cabin if you want to slow down, not pound, and stay dry get an inboard lobsterboat. That eastern is only good for slow rides in chop, but the cabin will keep you dry at least.
     
  5. Shark49

    Shark49 Member

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    I run a deep V 1995 key west WA Cuddy with 130 etec. I have made the run back from Block Island in 15-20 knot winds from east with a strong out going tide and it was wet and bumpy at a12-15 knot cruise. I usually have no problem with a big swell(6-10) as long as I time things right.
    If I’m going to upgrade I’m looking at getting a more comfortable cruise in these conditions at 15-20 knots and a 25-30 knot cruise in flat conditions.
    I know that this is all a matter of opinion but I will take what ever input I get.
    Thanks
     
  6. Shark49

    Shark49 Member

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    Novivin what do you consider slow.
     
  7. novivin

    novivin Senior Member

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    Well, like blitzen said, the devil is in the details. If you drift fish or anchor, the seaway/eastern hard chine 24 hardtop sport might be good since it rolls less than a soft chine boat of similar size. Looks like you already slow to 12-15 in the boat you have when it is shitty, so if you got that boat with a 150, then you would maybe do 8-12 when it is bad and have all the speed you want when it is flat. Less power in that boat and you will never see those fast cruise numbers. I have a 22 soft chine Novi OB with Yamaha 115 and do 17 fast cruise on calm water and 12 in 2-3’ chop taking it on the bow quarters or side-to and can do a 4’ following sea at 14 knots no prob. At 8 knots I can take 4’+ beam to or quartering and side-to. If you ask me, anything greater and you should not have left the shore. I have not run the seaway, but suspect it pounds more than mine ever will during these speeds and conditions due to the hard chines, but mine will roll you to smithereens side to, but I just use drift socks to point the boat the way I want and catch more fish.
     
  8. Red1beard

    Red1beard Senior Member

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    I have owned a Seaway 24 hardtop sport for four years now. Powered with a 130 etec. Head sea under 3'. Keep the speed 15 knots Max. Now this is Long Island Sound around the Old Saybrook area with runs over to Greenport Long Island. Wide open in calm is around 27 knots. Following sea is a whole different ball game. With an aluminum prop could not get the bow up , and coming off a wave it was a handful. Put a Stainless one on and is much better. Spence is a member here and has had quite the adventures in his 24. Look for laughing gull charters. I believe he fished in Alaska last year and the year before I believe he started on the Hudson , across the great lakes and down the Mississippi River, up the intercoastal and home. I like mine,does what I want it to.
     
  9. Spence

    Spence Senior Member

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    I concur with Red Beard on 15 knots. I am getting similar performance with 115 Yamaha. In a following sea I have had good luck raising the bow by trimming up the engine-a trick somebody on this forum was kind enough to share. Haven't heard from Magnolia Sun in awhile. How's that 150 Honda working for you?
     
  10. Red1beard

    Red1beard Senior Member

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    Occupation:
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    24 ft seaway
    I forgot to mention. There is another 24' in the marina where I keep mine. That has a 150 on it. Running wide open in calm water boat gets a bit squirrelly. Wanders a bit like it does not have enough in the water.
     
  11. Frank Grimes

    Frank Grimes Captain

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    Head sea under 3' @ 15kts...what about head sea over 3'? Stay home?
     
  12. Spence

    Spence Senior Member

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    From my Laughing Gull Boat Charters Blog for what its worth if you have time that needs killing

    0 Comments
    Our customized Seaway 24 as a loop boat
    6/8/2016

    1 Comment


    Perhaps the third most common question after “ How do you feel now that the trip is over?” and “What are you going to do now?” is “How did the boat do?”. As expected, the boat did absolutely great. We'd cruised Laughing Gull as extensively as possible for the two years before our loop and knew she's comfortable, seaworthy and economical. She is also a real head turner, we get lots of compliments on her downeast good looks.

    My evaluation of her seaworthiness is based entirely on experience before the loop. On the loop we had no schedule and almost no need to be anywhere at any time. We boated when it was “fun” and “comfortable” the idea of “safe” or “passable” was not in the equation. If we wandered up some lovely sheltered estuary to explore when a blow was forecast and the blow didn't happen that was fine with us. If we encountered sloppy conditions we simply turned back to a sheltered spot and waited for conditions to improve. I've negotiated rougher seas in my 16' tin skiff than anything we dealt with on the loop.
    Before the loop I had Laughing Gull out on 3 occasions that were safe and passable but really not fun or comfortable. Two of these occasions were schedule driven(one of the greatest boating hazards in my opinion) and the third featured a weather forecast that reversed itself after we'd committed to an open water run.
    The first schedule driven event was a charter to show a couple of photography instructors some puffins for courses they proposed to run with me providing boat transport. The lead instructor was a Russian and could only be in town for 3 days. The local instructor partner grew up running the nasty breaking inlets on the New Jersey coast and was up for anything. So considering this a “working” trip as opposed to a regular charter for fun we picked the best of the 3 days and bounced across Muscongus Bay to Eastern Egg Rock and photographed puffins. That done, Jersey guy decided we needed to go see Pemaquid Point Light, one of Maine's more spectacular light houses but a 5 mile run across a beam sea. Well obviously the boat and I made it okay, the Russian fellow was an amazing shade of green and Jersey guy was talking about pizza and beer. The boat was incredibly solid but graceful in the breaking 5 foot chop we negotiated that morning and I was never doubtful. We saw any number of 6-7 foot waves but were able to go around them.
    The second schedule driven occasion was a long run from Providence Rhode Island to Gloucester, MA. A few days earlier I'd run Laughing Gull for 3 days(300 miles give or take) from Damariscotta Maine to Providence to attend the Land Trust Alliance Rally. I'd had the pleasure of my boss's company on the way down but a big workload, a busy wife and 2 small kids made a quick train ride home a better choice for him.
    I left Providence about 7 a.m after a marina operator was kind enough to sell me gas before he was open. The weather forecast was just okay and scheduled to really blow the next day so I needed to make some miles. Considering the forecast it was likely that I'd be curtailing the trip and phoning Libbey to come and get me with the truck and trailer. If I could get across Massachusetts Bay to Gloucester I could save her the aggravation of Boston traffic while towing the boat trailer.
    When I came out of the Sakonnet River mouth breaking 4 to 5' seas were rolling in out of the Southeast, again larger seas were present but avoidable. I slogged up the RI coast at 7-8 knots until I reached the point where the land swings north to New Bedford, MA. I realized there that if I made my way 6 or 7 miles to windward across Buzzards Bay I'd have a 30 mile sheltered run in the lee of the Elizabeth Islands and the western shore of Cape Cod.
    That plan worked fine and a few hours later I was coming out of the Cape Cod Canal and it was time to decide whether to hook west into the shelter of the Boston Harbor islands or straight line 25 miles of wide open Massachusetts Bay and save time. Fog was just starting to show at a few river mouths so the straight line course looked best.
    By the time I was halfway across the bay, seas (moderately steep but not breaking) were running to 4 feet on the stern quarter. I found I could run in fair comfort at 12 knots after trimming the engine up. Slower would have been more comfortable but heavy fog was starting to pour out of Salem Sound into the bay.
    Visibility was less than 50 yards and dark was less than a half hour away when I idled by the breakwater into Gloucester Harbor. At 150 miles and 11 hours underway this is my longest daily run to date in Laughing Gull. I made it to Hampton NH the next morning before wind started to howl and it was time to call for a pick up.
    The weather forecast for the Hawk Channel between Key West and Bahia Honda Key was for wind at 10-15 knots. seas at 2 to 3 feet and diminishing. The truck and trailer were up in the Everglades and our vacation time was coming to an end, it looked good to go.
    By the time we neared Bahia Honda winds were 15-20 and seas were abeam at 3-4'. I'm not sure if the pass into Bahia Honda is technically a breaking inlet but the steep surf was about 5' and breaking. Laughing Gull easily found a sweet spot on the back of a big wave and we chugged in a few hundred yards to shelter, being careful to not out run the wave.
    The bottom line is that I'm convinced this boat will handle far rougher water than I have the nerve to put to sea in.
     
  13. novivin

    novivin Senior Member

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    All of this sounds like what I would expect, in the hands of an observant and seasoned captain, familiar with the boat they have and not too foolhardy. It is however, a 24 foot boat. Do they have positive floatation? Just curious.
     
  14. KrisM

    KrisM New Member

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    Red1beard - I’m interested in a 2014 Seaway 24 Coastal. Just wondering if you have the same hull? I live inNiantic and would use it primarily in LI Sound to Greenport/Shelter and to Napatree/Watch Hill areas. I was wondering how she handles in a chop as these waters can get dicey. Can you let me know your experience. The boat I am looking at has a 150 Merc and is quite loaded. Any advice is welcome and appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
  15. Red1beard

    Red1beard Senior Member

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    24 ft seaway
    The coastal should be a heavier boat. I believe. The interior is fancier. The hard top sport is an open boat no liner. My 130 hp is big enough to push the boat as fast as I want to go. Hull has its happy place. 20 knots or so in calm water. 15 or so in rougher water and around 10 or so on those days you're questioning what the hell am I doing out here.
     
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  16. Old Mud

    Old Mud Captain

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    Well i'm glad someone here got to that question we all have. Having been there many times i appreciate the honesty /reality. To me that one is more important than the 25 to 30 kt. on flat water. (Or any other time). Thank you !! :)

    Oh BTW Shark, no difference between 20' and 24' save the bottom and breadth.
     
  17. Spence

    Spence Senior Member

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    The HT Sport weighs 2850, 3950 for the Coastal. Same hull except I think all the Coastals have the Bracket?
     
  18. Shark49

    Shark49 Member

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    Coastal has a liner. My Hard Top sport gets delivered to Twin Hull boats in Bridgeport CT tomorrow.
    I put a ful Armstrong bracket and tuna door on it. CJ,Chris,Paul, and Donna are top notch! I been dealing with them for 15 plus years and they have always been solid people. Can’t wait to get it in the water.
     
  19. Sagamore Creek

    Sagamore Creek Member

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    All good comments. Spence has it right. The extra 1,100 lbs. on the Coastal vs. the Hardtop Sport come from the liner and extra stuff in the cabin. Bracket or not is an option on both. I have a the coastal with a 150 hp Yamaha on a bracket. Solid combination. I like to cruise about 16-17 knots when I need to get somewhere, and slower when I'm not in a rush. Anything over 20 would make you want to switch to a different boat/hull. That's okay by me, because the 10-15 knot range is really smooth and economical. It's my first season with this boat (had another smaller Seaway years ago), but it has been great running along the coast of NH, ME and MA. Really happy with it.

    A little side note... the dock where I keep my boat goes to mud at negative low tides. My Seaway proudly sits upright next to the dock, and then gently rises with the tide. The other boats on the dock are deeper vees (Whalers and Larsons) and they sit terribly on their sides, pressed against the dock or strained against their lines.
     
  20. Spence

    Spence Senior Member

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    How are folks doing for fuel economy?With my 115 Yamaha at 4K rpm/17mph I'm getting about 4mpg. At 1.8K rpm/6mph I get 7 mpg. All per the interface with Lowrance and the main engine. Yeah, I know someplace on the lowrance there is a setting for knots/nm's but I haven't bothered to find it.
     

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