Anchoring....again!

manni-yunk

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I didnt want to hijack the other thread.

I do a lot of anchoring. Both with a Grapnel, and a danforth, and sometimes with no anchor at all (chain tied directly into a wreck). I have used the ball retrieval method extensively as well.

I would LOVE to set it up to that I do not have to send anyone up to the bow, especially when it gets rough. I was planning on a hydraulic Capstan on the new boat - but the idea of a hauler in the cockpit is very intriguing to me.

When we do deep diving - the goal is to reduce exertion for a period of time, so even the exertion of pullin gup 200 ft of line with 30 ft of chain can be bad.


I searched Youtube - but I was wondering if anyone has video of ther set up of exactly HOW they deploy and retrieve the anchor, without heading up to the bow.
 

Captlvb

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I have thought about this too. I really would not want the job of going up onto the bow in sporty weather. I think I remember hearing that one boat had a line running up to the bit on the bow they could attach to the ground tackle which was hauled or set from the cockpit. I believe it was rigged with a line to retrieve the line back to the cockpit. Sorry for no pics or diagrams.
 

El Mar

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twister

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on a couple boats I fish on and my own, we always work the anchor line from the cockpit. the line runs from a tote or basket in the cockpit up to the bow chock. the line is cleated off in the cockpit or just ahead on the mid ship cleat. We all use a ball to retrieve the anchor so its easy to get the anchor line hauled back to the cockpit for deployment next time.
 

Magician

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When ever I would fish in rough weather I would always run the end of the anchor rode up on the bow, through the chock, around the bow cleat, down the rail, and tie it off to the cleat beside the hauler. All this was done at the dock you could set and retrieve the anchor from the hauler/cockpit without ever having to step on the rail no matter try to make it up and back from the bow.
 

Fishinengineer

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Hauler set up

Set up a few fairleads to belay the line up to the bow. I installed a pivoting davit for the anchor but will probably change to a pulpit with two anchors. The grey fairleads are blowboat winches, you have to remove the ratchet that acts as an anti reverse, these can be had cheap at someplace like marine consignment of LI. The other rollers are trailer rollers that I mounted in some stout aluminum. The line never comes off the rollers and I can pass some fair sized shackles. I've seen some other good pulley setups but some need the line cut to pass through the blocks. My hauler is at my helm and I never need to go up to the bow.

P6080684.jpg

P6080685.jpg
 

jwalka51

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Its called a riding line. OK? Here We go again. Attach a small pulley to the bow bit on your boat. You can do this in any way that you see fit. Mine is just attached using a 1 foot loop that I spliced up. Next Take a length of a decent quality rope and run it from your cockpit, along the side of your wheelhouse, through the pully that you installed on the bow and then run it back into the cockpit. Now, cut the rope so that you have a little extra to work with on each end. On one of the ends, attach a good quality snatch or seine block. When you are ready to anchor up, you will throw the anchor in the water and let some scope out. Then take the snatch block thats tied to the end of your riding line and snap it over the anchor line. After that, pull the other end of the line until you two block the bow block and the snatch block, At this point the anchor line will be going through the snatch block which will be on the bow if you have done this correctly. Now cleat off the working end of the riding line. Now you can finish letting out as much scope as you desire on your anchor line. Once you are where you want to be, cleat it off and enjoy your fishing.

When you are ready to retrieve your anchor, un-cleat the riding line, then start hauling in the anchor line, (you are still in the cockpit while doing all of this), as you are hauling the anchor line, the snatch block will come back into the cockpit with the anchor, once it comes in, Just remove it from the anchor line and tie it and the other end of the riding line off where ever you choose in the cockpit. This will secure it until you are ready to use it again.

The advantage that this method has over setting up a pulpit and hauling the anchor through that, is that as you are hauling the line in, you can just flake it into a tote and throw the anchor on top of it when you are done. You can then store the anchor tote where ever you like. But, if you use a pulpit, and you are hauling from your cockpit, the anchor gets stuck on the bow and stays there in the pulpit. Which means that you either have a tote full of rope that is still attached to the anchor so you cant really store it out of the way because you will still be attached to it, or you have to separate the anchor line from the chain to store it, which is not only a pain in the ass, but also could be dangerous if you are in a tight spot and need to rapidly deploy your anchor.

Further more, those pulpit set ups some times get stuck, so you may end up having to go out onto the bow to deploy the thing anyways. Which is exactly the type of situation that we are trying to avoid. And last but not least, with that pulpit, you have that ever present chain wrapped around your wheel house and across your bow that will be beating up your gel-coat every time that you deploy or haul in your anchor.

To summ it up, got with a riding line. It is cheap, easy, safe and can very quickly and easily be removed if you desire. Those pulpit set ups are a waste of time and money and the look like shit. Never mind the fact that they add an extra two or three feet to your boat that can hinder manueverability in tight places and may cost more for slip length.
 

Regina E

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Manny if you are really interested in seeing how the dual anchor system is employed and the ease of use it allows to the crew, just jump on one of the boats that use them.

There are quite a few of us that fish through the winter that use them. Kill 2 birds with one stone. Do some fishing and check out the setup and employment of them.
 

steveinak

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Its called a riding line. OK? Here We go again. Attach a small pulley to the bow bit on your boat. You can do this in any way that you see fit. Mine is just attached using a 1 foot loop that I spliced up. Next Take a length of a decent quality rope and run it from your cockpit, along the side of your wheelhouse, through the pully that you installed on the bow and then run it back into the cockpit. Now, cut the rope so that you have a little extra to work with on each end. On one of the ends, attach a good quality snatch or seine block. When you are ready to anchor up, you will throw the anchor in the water and let some scope out. Then take the snatch block thats tied to the end of your riding line and snap it over the anchor line. After that, pull the other end of the line until you two block the bow block and the snatch block, At this point the anchor line will be going through the snatch block which will be on the bow if you have done this correctly. Now cleat off the working end of the riding line. Now you can finish letting out as much scope as you desire on your anchor line. Once you are where you want to be, cleat it off and enjoy your fishing.

When you are ready to retrieve your anchor, un-cleat the riding line, then start hauling in the anchor line, (you are still in the cockpit while doing all of this), as you are hauling the anchor line, the snatch block will come back into the cockpit with the anchor, once it comes in, Just remove it from the anchor line and tie it and the other end of the riding line off where ever you choose in the cockpit. This will secure it until you are ready to use it again.

The advantage that this method has over setting up a pulpit and hauling the anchor through that, is that as you are hauling the line in, you can just flake it into a tote and throw the anchor on top of it when you are done. You can then store the anchor tote where ever you like. But, if you use a pulpit, and you are hauling from your cockpit, the anchor gets stuck on the bow and stays there in the pulpit. Which means that you either have a tote full of rope that is still attached to the anchor so you cant really store it out of the way because you will still be attached to it, or you have to separate the anchor line from the chain to store it, which is not only a pain in the ass, but also could be dangerous if you are in a tight spot and need to rapidly deploy your anchor.

Further more, those pulpit set ups some times get stuck, so you may end up having to go out onto the bow to deploy the thing anyways. Which is exactly the type of situation that we are trying to avoid. And last but not least, with that pulpit, you have that ever present chain wrapped around your wheel house and across your bow that will be beating up your gel-coat every time that you deploy or haul in your anchor.

To summ it up, got with a riding line. It is cheap, easy, safe and can very quickly and easily be removed if you desire. Those pulpit set ups are a waste of time and money and the look like shit. Never mind the fact that they add an extra two or three feet to your boat that can hinder manueverability in tight places and may cost more for slip length.

OR
learn to tie a rolling hitch on the riding line to anchor line conection and do away with all the other ropes and blocks :D
riding line.jpg

riding line 2.jpg

riding line.jpg

riding line 2.jpg
 
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Lion's Paw

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If you are going to be doing any amount of anchoring or work on the foredeck at all just put up a safety railing. I just really don't understand the aversion to having a railing system on the bow. Properly installed they are not an issue and then you don't have to be scared to go forward and anchor the boat. Just might save the life of you or your crew when nobody falls overboard easily at sea or even at the dock.
 

Tuna Pursuit

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Keep it simple. Buy 100' shot of 1/2" poly(yellow) it's floating line. Splice a thimble in one end and a loop in the other. Splice a carbine snap hook on the end of your anchor line. Run the poly up the outside of the bow rail loop first then back through the pulpit or bow rail stanchion and back into the cockpit. This is all done at the dock or on mooring. Cleat it off for now. Keep your anchor rode & chain in a fish tote in the cockpit. When you get to the spot where you want the anchor lower it over the side and have your mate tell you when it hits bottom then slowly run down wind paying out the rode which is snapped to the floating line. You also need a ball with a short piece of line spliced to it & a snap spliced to the end of the line. Snap that ball into the thimble of the floating line where the anchor rode is attached. Keep the loop on a cleat. Now just swing the boat around & your tight. When you leave get you heading & run up the anchor line until you get some slack then stop & get your ring & ball on there & pull it up.

One more tip. Once I have it floating on the ball behind the boat I run down wind so I'm down wind of the anchor when it comes aboard, this way you don't drift over it.
 

CEShawn

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I use the anchor ball but everything I do is from the cockpit.

I have a cleat in the cockpit that I tie off to, very important to me to be above the gunnel. Then I have the line going up the side of the boat in two, U-bolts. I do this to keep it off of the hull. Then at the bow chock, I make sure I do not have the normal ones, they can cut off your anchor line, I use the rounded bar ones, I have to put them on this boat, they were on my GM26. I have cut off anchor lines very quickly as it is pulling back against you.

I come up on it just like it was tied off in the corner, it comes up the side of the hull just fine. At no time am I recleating it off. I do this by myself, of course have a knife right next to the cleat and on myself too. I then just take a gaff and grab the line coming up.

The reason why I do single anchoring like this is, when bottom fishing if I want to drop back 15' or move forward its easier to adjust. Also if this time I drop in 20' and 2 hours later in 50' do not need to go and adjust off the bow to do it. Its all done right there at the aft helm. Wish I had a picture of this.

My question is, with a hauler is anyone getting away with getting the anchor on the bow, without a puplit, with just one of those anchor holders? Or does it hit the side of the hull coming up?

The good one

Chock Skene 7"" Stainless Steel Pair

Ones I've seen cut off anchor lines doing what I do.

Chock Skene Stainless Steel 6"" Pair

I had one of these mounted on my boat, but not sure that you can haul up the anchor without it hitting the bow if its not on a puplit... educate me!

ANCHOR ROLLER S/S FOR ANCHORS TO 14 LB. 741209
 

CEShawn

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Thats why I think, just was wondering why it was there... Sandy took care of it for me when a boat came down the canal and took it off... I guess maybe a few seconds easier to get the anchor down and overboard if you had too but not even sure how it would rest there, hell it might of not even had an anchor. Guess if anyone has a picture of one begin used without a puplit, please share.
 

jwalka51

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The only problem with the rolling hitch is that to let out more anchor line you have to untie the hitch. With the block, you can haul the anchor in some or let it out some without having to screw with anything.
 
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