Anchoring

Cool Boat

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Just a quick note that we switched from a pair (one very large for storm) Danforth with chain to a Supermax claw type. The rode to depth ratio can be reduced and they highly advise that you use no chain whatsoever as it will dig in too deep. There are three settings on it, we used the middle one. If anchoring in hurricane conditions in a harbor it was cautioned to use stainless steel cable for at least 25' as it will keep burying. Great anchor for us but had some issues with the Danforths. We were lucky to get ours as all the weldable tool steel was being scarfed up to armor plate the Humvees that were getting shredded in Iraq. Not sure if the newer anchors are the same quality as the company has changed hands as of 2016.
 

Haddock

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I like BBB chain and as much and as large as the boat and her windlass can reasonably handle. On boats that cannot deal with the weight of all-chain rode, my rule of thumb is no less than a boat length of chain, shackled to the anchor without a swivel, then soft rode from the chain to the boat. If the windlass cannot handle BBB and parts are unavailable for that conversion, then I go up one size on the chain, if possible. On workboats with an horizontal hydraulic windlass, wire rope instead of soft rode, then heavy chain at least for the last boat-length. And, always, proper anchor type for the bottom, at least adequate scope for the conditions, including tide, wind, current, etc., and proper setting and verification of the anchor setting before calling it good.
I agree with your comments but I have never had a windlass; I use the young son or anchor ball methods for retrieval :) I have found that chain is much more effective than extra scope of line but I have never had a boat bigger than my current 23' .
 

Genius

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Just a quick note that we switched from a pair (one very large for storm) Danforth with chain to a Supermax claw type. The rode to depth ratio can be reduced and they highly advise that you use no chain whatsoever as it will dig in too deep. There are three settings on it, we used the middle one. If anchoring in hurricane conditions in a harbor it was cautioned to use stainless steel cable for at least 25' as it will keep burying. Great anchor for us but had some issues with the Danforths. We were lucky to get ours as all the weldable tool steel was being scarfed up to armor plate the Humvees that were getting shredded in Iraq. Not sure if the newer anchors are the same quality as the company has changed hands as of 2016.
Super High penetration anchors preform better with wire rope than chain. The chain hinders penetration. I’m not familiar with the supermax claw.
 

Cool Boat

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Super High penetration anchors preform better with wire rope than chain. The chain hinders penetration. I’m not familiar with the supermax claw.
They noted the wire rope kept the rode our of sediment/sand that would chafe it. We also had a shorter trip line off the rear of the anchor, but never needed it. In a storm one might need it.
 

HARDTAIL

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Kailua Kid

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They noted the wire rope kept the rode our of sediment/sand that would chafe it. We also had a shorter trip line off the rear of the anchor, but never needed it. In a storm one might need it.
The trip line is good practice/good seamanship in any event, suspended from a small sentinel buoy. That way, not only do you have a much better chance of retrieving your anchor even if it fouls on a cable or rock crevice, etc., but others in the area can see where your anchor is and therefore be more able to avoid fouling your anchor with theirs or anchoring too close, etc.
 

Kailua Kid

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Genius and others....thanks for sharing your knowledge. I will share my recent anchor learnings. My recently purchased boat came with a Bruce claw anchor and about 20' of 5/16" G4 chain directly braided to 200' of three-strand 5/8" rope. This looked to be a "kitted" setup that came from a big box store. Upon inspection, I noticed serious corrosion where the rope was braided onto the link. The connection did not look like anything I wanted to trust on a 28,000 pound boat. Never mind the fact that in a few days we were about to embark on a 1400 mile journey from FL to RI with plans of anchoring every night along the ICW. I quickly learned that windlesses are finicky and need a particular chain size/link size. Also if doing a rope to chain connection it has to be a braided connection as to not jam when going through the windless. I could not find anyone to resplice/braid the rope to the anchor chain on short notice. So....I purchased 100' of 5/16" G4 chain and have been using that without any issues. The boat is setup with a pulpit and Lofrans low profile windless. My personal preference has always been to use all chain if possible. Although the Lofrans spec was for 5/16" bbb chain...it would not work with bbb. It would jam constantly. My particular Lofrans setup seems to only want to work with G4 chain. We anchored in all bottom types and in some pretty nasty wind/tide conditions. Always anchored in 10-25' of water & never had any issues. I'm sure there are better anchor setups but I have found this setup to work well.
Sounds like someone changed out the wildcat on your windlass from the original one, designed to work with the 5/16 BBB, to one that fits the G4 chain.
 
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