Best Downeast Hull Size for Offshore Fishing

kcboyle84

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After owning a 25 foot center console for a few years, I'm looking to purchase an AJ-28. I'll primarily be fishing off of the North Fork of Long Island but would like the ability to fish 60-70 miles offshore (off Montauk) if needed. The boat has a relatively new Yanmar 6LV-350 HP diesel engine and 120 gallon fuel tank so I'll likely need to get a bladder. More importantly I think is whether folks think a 28 downeast boat is big enough to go offshore in the first place. Down here plenty of guys run out to the canyons in 28 foot center consoles but that's a different game. Not sure if I need to be looking at 32s or even a 36s for safety. Any advice here would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

CCtuna

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I see no problem with that. Obviously gotta keep an eye to the sky. Should have some good speed with that power too
 

Underdog11

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c1steve

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If an AJ-28 gets 3 mpg while cruising, then you need 50 gallons for 150 mile round trip. Check the AJ website for fuel consumption numbers. Probably do not need a bladder.
 

John Sprowl

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Boston Whaler, There is no substitute.
I guess I should do a better job with spelling. With that said with every mile off shore the risk compounds and preparation needs to increase accordingly. Nothing matches being on the ocean but 70 miles offshore in a 28’ downeast boat comes with alot of risk.
These risk can be mitigated with planning and preparation. Watch the weather, fish with a buddy boat, captain training and practicing various scenarios such as a thru hull starts leaking and slowing or stopping the flooding, just to name a few. Being prepared is everything.
A couple of old saying with engines there is no replacement for displacement and with boats offshore, size matters.
 

Fishnjess

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I looked at a lot of boats; nauset 27’, a bhm 28’, a mdi 30’. And I came to the same conclusion, to small, no bunks, tiny head, engine boxes, etc. it forces me to look at 33’ and up. Not to mention the shorter the hull the tougher the ride. IMHO
 

Diesel Jerry

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Downrigga

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The bigger the rake, the bigger the dead rise, the higher the free board, the better you are off shore. Blown forecasts happen. You can do it in a 28 aj. I have seen crazy small boats off shore. You just mitigate risk better in a larger hull. I fish the canyons very often. You can experience different weather systems going too and coming from that are not even in the forecast. Building high pressure systems that squeeze wind or pop up t storms that come out of no where, change things up quickly. If i owned an 28 aj i would just pick my days and go for it. If i was looking to purchase a boat to fish the canyons i would want something a bit bigger. When you hear the term canyon weight your pretty heavy with gear and ice. You kind of need that to fish the canyons properly. In a 28 foot boat you dont have a lot left over for the bounty. A word of advice, even in my boat i never go to the canyons when there is really shitty weather behind a good forcast. It can take a commercial tow a long time to reach you. You dont want to be caught in that kind of weather waiting for a hook.
 
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c1steve

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On the west coast, many persons feel that to go 60-150 miles offshore, a 37' boat or larger is recommended.
 

Reel polack

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I think time of year is a major player. I think a sea anchor is more important than most. If you are in a pilothouse and have a few 1000 gph bilges with a backup oh shit 2000gph pump I say go for it with the proper window. But I'm a dumb polack
 

Downrigga

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I think time of year is a major player. I think a sea anchor is more important than most. If you are in a pilothouse and have a few 1000 gph bilges with a backup oh shit 2000gph pump I say go for it with the proper window. But I'm a dumb polack
A sea anchor can save your life. If you put a 3 inch hole in a hull below the water line, a 2000 gph pump wont even come close to handling the amount of water that will come in through that hole. One very handy thing to carry on board are a couple of nerf footballs. You can cut them and shape them to stuff in lots of odd holes.
 
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PatriciaLynn

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An AJ-28 is fine, pick your days and go. A better question is "If I am wondering if this is safe, am I really prepared to be doing this."
 

Seal

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I've run a Dyer 29 to the canyons for nearly 25 years, and the pocket downcast boats of less than 32' but greater than 26' will give you a comfortable ride. Just watch the weather, and stick mostly with "light and variable" in the forecast, and you'll be fine. We would burn at total of 100 gallons for an overnight trip to the canyons. It's also nice to have a dry bunk down below to catch a cat nap rather than a soaking wet bean bag. Day trips to the Lanes and the Flats below the Lanes are easy and well within the range of a small downcast hull.
 

Bill_N

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I would install a Floscan if your boat doesn't already have one. This might be the best upgrade I've made to my JC. It will allow you to know what you burn under different conditions, per trip and how much fuel you've burned total. Once it's calibrated it should be within a few gallons at fill-up. You might be OK with 120 Gallons. My JC holds 200 and I typically burn 125 - 140 gallons on an overnight trip but the closest canyon for me is 90 miles.
 
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