Block heaters

WoundUpMarine

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BobG04

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Had one for years. More than enough. Kept the whole bilge warm. Motor sat around 100 degrees when it was 30 outside.
 

CEShawn

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I've been looking at those Wolverine Pad heaters that go on the oil sump, seem easy and friends like them...
 

CEShawn

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Tony Athens right? Great guy, nice guy... talked to him about buying a Cummins recently... Friend just bought one from him...
 

WoundUpMarine

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Helen L

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I have 2 magnetic heaters I leave on the bottom of the pan all winter long. They definitely do their job, are easily removable, cheap, and actually seem to heat the whole engine room a little more. Bought them from Northern Hydraulics
 

BillD

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I have 2 magnetic heaters I leave on the bottom of the pan all winter long. They definitely do their job, are easily removable, cheap, and actually seem to heat the whole engine room a little more. Bought them from Northern Hydraulics

In my mind it is always better to heat from the "bottom up".
Heat rises.
Then again, a 250W "slow roast" insert heater anywhere into the block in contact with anti-freeze is very convenient.

Whatever the install takes, engines thank us owners for the "extra heat" to keep them dry and help when firing them up!

An "oldie" just popped into my mind.

Remember the old Sunoco commercials?????

"Sunoco makes your car start like it's summer time"

same thing with heat with diesels !!!
 
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Helen L

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Bill,

Right on. Exact reason a couple of the larger draggers in my harbor leave the aux engines on for days at a time often...to keep the moisture levels in check in the engine rooms. To them, it's worth the fuel burn if the boats are going to sit all winter wet.

My 671 is still a bear to start on the colder days however, even with 2 heaters on the pan. Just the way these older Detroits are. Friend put a fresh completely rebuilt 871 in his clam boat last year and has the same trouble. Such rough engines but I love them...run forever.
 

WoundUpMarine

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steveinak

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Bill,

Right on. Exact reason a couple of the larger draggers in my harbor leave the aux engines on for days at a time often...to keep the moisture levels in check in the engine rooms. To them, it's worth the fuel burn if the boats are going to sit all winter wet.

My 671 is still a bear to start on the colder days however, even with 2 heaters on the pan. Just the way these older Detroits are. Friend put a fresh completely rebuilt 871 in his clam boat last year and has the same trouble. Such rough engines but I love them...run forever.

I had a J&T 6-71 in my lobster boat years ago, in the winter i could get it to start easily by just misting the air intake with a squirt of starting fluid, i'd hold the can 3 feet away from the breather and just touch the button on the can.
 

CEShawn

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Of course everyone has opinions and do not want to hurt others... I was taught that starting fluid can be damaging to diesel engines. Something about the lack of lubrication at start up. I was taught to use WD-40, mainly because its not as strong starting fluid, may have a little lubrication which is debatable but mainly because its propellant in the can is PROPANE. I know several times it has kept me out of a jam and works really well. As an engineer I also keep a can in all of my lifeboats on the ship just in case. I just wonder day in and day out if it does damage. Granted I have a can for a "get out of jail" situation... Any of this sound familiar to others?

I remember one time I started my MACK E9 when it really shouldn't have started. I think we ended up having it firing on 5 of cylinders, but they were out of whack. The fuel injection pump, the keyway that rotates the cam to deliver fuel failed. Ended up with an aweful slick behind the boat...
 

WoundUpMarine

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Helen L

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I had a J&T 6-71 in my lobster boat years ago, in the winter i could get it to start easily by just misting the air intake with a squirt of starting fluid, i'd hold the can 3 feet away from the breather and just touch the button on the can.

I have a can of ether for those times it just doesn't want to go. I just hate using ether though. Rather sit there for 10 mins slowly warming it up then using ether.
 

CEShawn

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I am hoping people chime in about the WD-40. I know it was taught to me from some pretty good people and professionals. I should maybe drop a note on boatdiesel but we know how that goes, lol...

I havent seen it in a bit, but there is something about prelube pumps. I know we have them on all our larger engines over lets say 2000HP. I do know some people have put them on smaller engines down to lets say 300HP. I bet an oil pan heater and/or pump with a heater would really help that time, really warm up the block... I think some people put prelube pumps on newer Volvo's, as they had to see oil pressure before they would start, aka an easy prelube pump...
 

Helen L

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I am hoping that with a new fully enclosed and insulated house it'll be toastier in the winter and she'll crank easier. Intake comes up through the floor and sucks from inside the house.
 

Bad Influence

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morning all...just brought this older thread back up and goy to thinking. As I'm laid up for winter and not running engine, Was womdering abput engine ROOM warmer/heaters. The kind they advertize for keeping room "warmer" during winter season. Any comments/suggestion/ recomedfations? Thanks Tommy:rolleyes:
 

Bad Influence

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morning all...just brought this older thread back up and goy to thinking. As I'm laid up for winter and not running engine, Was wondering about engine ROOM warmer/heaters. The kind they advertize for keeping room "warmer" during winter season. Any comments/suggestion/ recomedfations? Thanks, Tommy:rolleyes:
 
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