Boat fire

Pitou

Captain
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Posts
529
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316
Location
Cape Ann
First Name
Kevin
Boat Make
'06 Albin 31 TE
Lithium Ion batteries, those are what's in all the cordless tools we have, yes? Should I be concerned about them in my house or garage?
Concerned to the point of being sure to always being around when they're charging. I never leave home or go to bed with lithium batteries charging.

I have a good friend whose house burned to the ground from a fire that started from "multiple" lithium batteries from his hand tools living in their chargers on his bench in his attached garage. Did one ignite or more? Who knows. He and his family lost everything. Not pretty.
 

c1steve

Admiral
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
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The Dewalt charges I used to use would never shut off, they made me nervous. I now use Makita and the chargers go into full shut down and do not automatically power back up. I did have one Makita battery that went bad, and the charger would not cycle it. So IMO, I would only use Lithium battery tools that had a good charging system.
 

Genius

Admiral
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
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Location
Rhode Island
First Name
David
Boat Make
32 Morse Cove
Concerned to the point of being sure to always being around when they're charging. I never leave home or go to bed with lithium batteries charging.

I have a good friend whose house burned to the ground from a fire that started from "multiple" lithium batteries from his hand tools living in their chargers on his bench in his attached garage. Did one ignite or more? Who knows. He and his family lost everything. Not pretty.
That shit scares the hell out of me. I don't even store them in tools anymore.
 

Pitou

Captain
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Posts
529
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316
Location
Cape Ann
First Name
Kevin
Boat Make
'06 Albin 31 TE
That shit scares the hell out of me. I don't even store them in tools anymore.
Same here. Charge them up pull them from their chargers and keep them uninstalled. After what I saw happen at my friend's house, I take zero chances. Stay safe.
 

hunttr

1st Mate
Joined
Aug 23, 2015
Posts
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Location
Pt. Judith ,RI
First Name
Brian
Boat Make
Dyer 29
they never hurt. But I suspect they are like a road flare, hard to put out. I really haven't any knowledge if they are extinguishable???
A big challange for firefighters putting out electric car fires.Not only the difficulty of extinguishing the fire but also a shock hazard.
 
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Scooby

1st Mate
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Posts
167
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First Name
Jeff
In case anyone is interested....

Hello boaters,

The reason you are getting this email is because you have stayed with us on a mooring or dock at some point, you may have a mooring, launch or facility use permit with us or even just asked to be on our mailing list. For those of you who are not even close to Kittery, and Kittery Point I apologize for this email as it doesn't pertain to you but I wanted to reach out to everyone I have on my email list.

In the next few days, you will see activity in the Pepperrell Cove and Piscatiqua River that will involve barges, divers, and equipment. This activity is related to the salvage of the Too Elusive yacht that was on fire and drifting out of Little Harbor on Saturday, June 18th. The boat drifted into Kittery waters before sinking. You may have smelled the odor of smelled the odor of diesel fuel or even saw a sheen on the water in the area where it sank (about 1.5 miles SE of 2 the 2 KR buoy). The fuel leak is obviously not good but several agencies have been keeping an eye on it as well as our commercial fishing fleet (for obvious reasons). Included in monitoring the fuel leak has been the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office, Maine Marine Patrol, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, NH Marine Patrol, Kittery Harbormaster Department and Kittery Fire Department.

The diesel appears to be coming up in bubbles (about the size of your thumbnail). I about 1-2 bubbles every ten seconds. When it reaches the surface, it makes that rainbow-colored sheen and then connects to other little circles of sheen which makes the "slick) for lack of a better word. We measured it on a flat calm day, and we estimated that it was about 50 feet wide and about 350 feet long. As far as thickness, you could touch it with your hand and almost nothing stays on your hand. They put absorbent pads on it (they called them diapers) and it could not absorb the sheen due to its thinness. The thing about gasoline and diesel fuel is that it is a light oil and it floats on top and is evaporated fairly quickly. We have not seen any residual on any shoreline in Kittery waters, so it appears to be evaporating before reaching shore.

So the plan......

The salvage company is planning on getting everything in place over the next two days. By everything in place, I mean, rigging the ship with hook ups for the float bags, getting the barges and other equipment in place so that Thursday morning, they can go out and float it up, put it on a barge then bring it to their pier and take it out of the water. The have hired US Ecological as the fuel recovery and mitigation team. That will involve putting a floating barricade boom around the entire operation that will move with the operation as it goes from floating the boat and then moving it to the lifting barge and stuff like that. What we need from you!!!!

This is a very delicate operation due to the fire likely causing the fiberglass in the hull to possibly be brittle so while the operation is happening, we really really really need you guys to stay out of the area and if you are transiting anywhere near it, try to stop your wake until you are clear. The salvage company said that they can only do it in 2 feet or less of waves and some of you guys have boats that can throw a huge wake which could endanger the people and the operation.

So the long and the short of it is, on Thursday early morning, the will float the sunken boat to the small barge, then tow it with the small barge to the big crane barge, lift it just high enough to pump out the fuel tanks, then lift it on to the big barge. If due to the integrity of the hull, they cant lift it safely onto the barge, they will drop it down to the bottom (the big barge will be in a shallow hard bottom area) then the will cut the motors out and lift it all individually.

So that’s it in a nutshell. Thank you all for understanding and a big thank you to all the commercial fleet for moving some of your gear and helping us come up with locations and track lines to make the operation go smoother and hopefully go off without a hitch.

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us although we will be busy over the next few day so responses may be delayed.

Thanks from all of us Harbormasters.
 

CaptMD

1st Mate
Joined
Sep 7, 2020
Posts
447
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209
Location
Eliot, Maine
On my way to Gosport Harbor Saturday, I saw this enterprise assembled not too far off Appledore Island. There was a Coast Guard boat standing watch nearby. Very cool big barges and boats to see.
 

CCtuna

Admiral
Joined
Oct 20, 2012
Posts
1,950
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Location
Nauset
Boat Make
Some day...
I was out there hauling when they were raising it. The diesel slick was horrible, far as you could see and my eyes were burning.
 


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