Eastporter 20

harpoon83

Admiral
Joined
Oct 4, 2011
Posts
1,059
Likes
955
Location
Groveland, Ma
First Name
Colin
Tipjar's not going to have any floatation, not even sealed bulkheads? Seems like a really bad idea to me, especially on a small boat? I'd rather have to rebuild the boat in 20 years than sink after a mishap that foam would have saved me from.

On the PT stuff you've seen, any evidence of resin not bonding to it well?
It might bond temporarily, but it will not bond long term.
Don't use it as as a stringer and attempt to glass it to the hull.
 

Diesel Jerry

Admiral
Lite User
Joined
Oct 25, 2015
Posts
10,821
Likes
10,261
Age
43
Location
South Freeport, ME

Diesel Jerry

Admiral
Lite User
Joined
Oct 25, 2015
Posts
10,821
Likes
10,261
Age
43
Location
South Freeport, ME

Trettig

Deckhand
Joined
Nov 12, 2022
Posts
6
Likes
2
First Name
Tom
As I layout the longitudinal and latitudinal stringers, it would be helpful to know where the best placement of the center console and seat would go. Is center of gravity a concern? I’ll be using the boat for fishing.
 

PatriciaLynn

Admiral
Joined
Jul 18, 2017
Posts
2,368
Likes
2,430
Location
Cape E
Boat Make
Repco
Weight distribution fore and aft is super important. Get the structure built and the deck in and then float it off of a trailer with some barrels of water that will simulate people and the CC. That will give you a good idea of where to place everything in order to get it floating just right.
 

tsharac

1st Mate
Joined
May 9, 2012
Posts
354
Likes
239
Location
Alexandria/Parksley, VA
First Name
Tim
Boat Make
1976 20' Eastporter; 1976 16' Stratford dory
Don't make the hulk thicker, use structure to reinforce it. Done correctly, it will add a ton of strength and be WAY lighter than just adding material to the hull.
I agree with this and what Eastporter said about not coating from the outside, but a few strange things happened with my hull.

After I transported it 500 miles and put it in the water, I noticed there were tiny fractures at the waterline where the trailer rollers support the hull on an old trailer with rusted solid leaf springs. No problem, I simply cut out the bad material and replaced with new.

Then a few months later I saw that the bow had been repaired and looked a little off. So I started picking at it with the claw end of a hammer. I got hold of a piece of gelcoat and fiberglass cloth and pulled on it. It pulled free as a single strip all the way back to the stern. Then I was able to keep removing the rest of the outer skin of the hull until the entire hull (except the transom) was stripped down to a very thin layer. There was very little bond between the outer cloth/gelcoat and the inner layer of fiberglass.

So, this being as thin as it was and knowing I fish the canyons, I wanted to make sure that there's material in the hull.

Like I said earlier, I think just one layer of 1200 or 1700 would have been fine for my hull, two layers of 1708 was overkill, but I've never peeled a boat like an onion before. Certainly my preference would have been to add this layer to the inside of the hull instead of outside, but I didn't have access from the inside because I wasn't replacing the deck and stringers (both recently replaced and solid) and the outside peeled off, so that's why I added material from the outside.

IMG_20200112_153843.jpg

IMG_20200112_124707(1).jpg

IMG_20200329_161129(1).jpg
 

Eastporter

Admiral
Joined
Sep 1, 2011
Posts
4,319
Likes
1,692
Location
MA
Boat Make
Sold- 20' Eastporter (Rebuilt 2011) 22' Pearson Ensign
Crazy but thanks for sharing. A few different people layed up those hulls and I think the earlier ones were definitely thin (trying to keep the cost of materials down probably).
 


Top Bottom