Emergency tiller

backman

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What is involved to fabricate an emergency tiller into a Hydroslave quadrant in case I had a hydraulic failure? Picture attached.

Having just moved from dual screw to single screw I'm trying to formulate a "what if " plan in case I lost steering while offshore.

In a pinch could the ram be disconnected and something be used to steer through the open hole in the quadrant?

steeringquadrant.jpg
 

CEShawn

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When the boat is in NB, have Scania come over and take a look at it. I know they have made several adapters for people in your situation. Forget the contact info over there.
 

Magician

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I ran a 50' head boat with an emergency tiller, it was just square steel stock welded to the top of the rudder post (smaller then the dia of the post) that a sleeve and tiller piece fit over. It did require that the piston be removed to operate.
 

GLA

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I have one on the provincial, just a fabricated bracket to attach to the rudder with a 6 ft pipe welded on to it. stow it down below out of the way as a just in case.

is that lead stacked up behind your steering?
 

backman

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That is 600# of lead to counter the weight of the QSM forward. Eric can explain better than I - but its a counterweight to the heavy QSM foreward.

My rudder stock is round; not square - can I make a braxket that uses the 2 holes of the quadrant instead or do I need to be directly on the rudder to steer?
 

traditions

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You could make an adapter that used the open hole on the quadrant and have a tab that goes down over the edges back toward the taper lock.Have a piece of round bar that dropped into the hole with a hair pin under the quadrant like on the ram.Or you could take that lexan mount for the rudder feedback and make it out stainless and weld a piece of something to accept a steerer.
 
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traditions

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Whatever you do ,just remember if you unhook the ram, hold on good to the steerer when you back down,or you wiil have the rudder in the wheel unless you have rudder stops or a cage on your boat.When I was a kid alot of steerers were made from old truck steering boxes and pipe,and when you backed down the wheel would spin around from the prop pulling the rudder.
 

captainlarry84

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Here is the emergncy tiller on my JC Boat. I have never had to use it. I did test it and it will get you home. You must disconnect the ram to use it

storm 092.jpg

storm 091.jpg

storm 093.jpg
 

backman

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I'm trying to visualize how that socket firs onto the rudder stock. Do you also disconnect and remove the quadrant in order to use the steerer?
 

captainlarry84

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I only have single ram steering so the disconnect is only the eye of the ram, plus the bonding straps. If you have dual ram and a quad it all must be removed so only the rudder stock is attached.
 

Tuna Pursuit

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Ok on this set up if you are removing the cylinder from the rudder you will have two holes. make a plate with two threaded studs to go in those two holes and bolt that on there and have a shaft connected to the plate & and a tiller arm coming off that shaft. I can model it up in about 10 minutes. Get me some demensions.
 

backman

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Mm not at the boat this weekend but will take you up on that next weekend. That was the solution i was trying to visualize - thanks!
 

tunafishhkg

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Although I do not like to add extra fittings, I use high pressure LOCKING ball valves at the ram so the tiller can work without disconnecting the ram in an emergency. If your failure is not due to lack of oil from a broken hose, it will feather the action and reduce feedback to the tiller arm if the ball valve only opened a little but this does take some trail and error.
 

SoBoSlow

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LB-

Trying to visualize.

From the picture the top of the rudder post is something like 6" off the hull. Do you want a straight arm (parallel to the hull/perpendicular to the rudder post) that is 6" off of the hull (ie you will be sitting wherever that picture is taken from with a tiller in your hand but very limited visibility) or can you go stright up off the top of the rudder post (and or associated hardware) and get above deck so the person stearing can be up on deck.

Look again at the pitcure from the JC. That looks like a stright shot down (probably 3-4') through the transom coaming board (maybe it is through the deck and only 2' down but the same issue). Is your rudder post under the board/deck? Can you get access straight down at it?

Now for the analysis: Assuming you want to run the tiller from up on deck you have two options.

1) You put what I will call "the riser" (part that runs from the top of the post to your rudder) directly over the rudder post. The benefit here is that the turning radius of the riser does not need to be more than the diameter of the riser. Problem is your access port needs to be directly over the rudder post and that may not be practical.

2) Alternatively, you put the riser into that open hole at the front of the steering quadrant (6" in front of the center of teh rudder post in your picture). Now the turning radius of the riser is the swing arc that is 6" from the post (you need, at the very least, a C shaped cut in the deck that is 6" from the top of the rudder post).

I have spent enough time on sailboat tillers to know that from the perspective of the attachment/rudder post: whether you go out, up and then out again or you go up and then out either can work fine and will not adjust the loads.

Once that is cleared up we will know where we need to attach and be able to work on how to attach it.

I hope this helps. Words are confusing but the picture is clear in my head (which, of course, does you no good).
 
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backman

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I have a lazarette deck hatch which I would flip up and secure. The goal is to have a 2 piece tiller than will stow in that lazarette.

I'm thinking a waist high riser (30"??), an equivalent tiller arm, a deck chair and a lot of beer!
 

SoBoSlow

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How about 2 plates slightly (1") larger than the non-circular part of the quadrant. On the bottom of one (the top plate) you add pipe section(s) that fit snugly through the hole(s) in the quadrant. In the other (bottom) plate you add holes corresponding to the quadrant holes/pipe sections. (you can also thread the outside of the pipe section so you can spin a nut up to secure them)

In the 1" perimeter you drill 4-6 matching holes through both plates. These holes should be at the edge of the quadrant dimensions. Place the top plate on top of the quadrant and the bottom plate under the quadrant and then bolt them together through the holes...you now have a way to make a removable/temporary quadrant sandwich.

To the top of the top plate you weld the end of a 30" riser that is @1.5" in cross-section (square may be best doe to the next step) big cross-section gives you more welding contact (this section will be subject to rotational sheering force so you may also want to brace it and there may be other ways to reinforce the joint).

About 1" down from the top of the riser drill a hole (through the leading and trailing edge of the riser) that is just large enough to snugly receive a 3/4" pipe. Your "tiller" will be a 30" by 3/4" pipe with a stopper plate at the trailing end and a hole, through the tiller, that is just in front of the leading edge of the riser (when the "tiller" is run through the riser and snugged up against the stopper plate)

You can store the riser/quadrant sandwich plates and tiller together taking up little more than the 30" run (rather than a 30x30" area). Then, if you need it, attach the riser/plates to the quadrant. Run the tiller through the hole in the riser. Drop a clevis pin through the hole in the "tiller". Set up a chair. Open a beer. Settle in for a long ride.
 
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tunafishhkg

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This is the folding emergency tiller that Turnwright machine built for a 40HH on its second emergency use after the second pump shaft failure. It turns out that the auto pilot solenoid valve was sticking between port and starboard commands causing excess pressure fighting each other breaking the shaft on the 3406 cat engine mounted pump. The autopilot worked so I thought it was just a defective pump but after second pump shaft failure, it finally stuck to just Port command.

IMG_0752.jpg
 
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