Hauler Vs. Anchor Ball

Linesiders

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Just looking for opinions on hauling an anchor with the use of a hauler vs. use of an anchor ball or by hand.

I had a discussion with an experienced captain who told me that if I choose to use the hauler (located at the helm) I run the risk of wrapping my anchor line in the prop, mainly because once the anchor breaks loose current could easily force the anchor under the boat.

Claims that it would be safer to use the anchor ball method.

To add to the discussion, I often fish alone or with inexperienced people, who may not be able to assist in pulling the anchor. The boat is a 28' downeast.

What are your opinions?

One of the main reasons I ask is because I'm considering removal of the hauler which I don't use for any other reason. Just don't want to regret that decision either.
 

Dr Dude

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MASTERENEGADE

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I anchor anchor all the time with the ball system. I absolutly love it. Very little can break and if anything does break its cheap to replace.

Down side: I use 22lb danforths w 6' of 1/2"(i believe)chain and 1/2" nylon. Lifting the anchors over the side once the ball has it suspended can be a bit back breaking. Esp in rougher conditions. The anchor and chain on a scale is approx 50lbs. Im 32 in pretty good shape, so far its not an issue, when i get Old n broken then I will prob install a hauler with a anchor tree on the bow.

My opinion use both, the ball to release the anchor from the bottom, then use the hauler to raise the anchor on board the boat.

Hope some of this helps with your decision making.
 

FlyingConnie

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I run a charter aboard a 28' DE. I use the ball to brake the anchor free and rise it to the surface. Then haul back 120'+ of rode and 20# danforth, it coils it nice into a tote. Its the best of both worlds. I was in your same position weather to take it off or not, but one blackfish season proved the hauler is a really nice. You do bend some hooks.
 

Keelboater

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Well, I am sort of old and broken at this stage. ;) Up until recently I pulled the anchor by hand. Never used a ball, but to be fair, the water in L.I.S. isn't really too deep for the most part. I finally installed a new pulpit and windlass a few years ago. Wish I had done it ten years ago when I first bought the boat! In fact, over the years I can honestly say that I wish all of my boats had one installed. But it must be a reliable and proven design or it's not worth the hassle. There is a lot of junk floating around out there. Literally. You always see guys hauling by hand despite that fancy looking thing on the bow. Ever wonder why?
 

captjohn

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Anchor balls are great....with a short length of line. But put up 1200 feet in the canyon, watch out for other boats running over it as your pulling it up early in the morning when everyone's up on the troll, and half asleep, it does happen. I don't have a hauler, but in deep water, I would use it first.
 

Fishinengineer

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Keep the hauler

Set up some sort of pulley system to get your anchor on the bow and use the hauler. I also fish solo 95% of the time and this has proven to be the safest, easiest way to get the anchor back. In the canyons if I have to anchor I'll use the ball to bring the anchor up then use the hauler to quickly get everything in.
 

Keelboater

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"And a windlass is made for cocktail cove not anywhere else :smile:"

I know what you mean Tuna. But if I used one on my 28 Bertram, I think it would just tip the boat over instead of haul the anchor! :eek: Maybe I should have said this instead " I never anchor, unless it's behind the jetty in calm water, which is usually shallow to begin with. So who needs a hauler?" :D Too funny.
 

googinhater

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When you have the hauler you will think all boats should have one easy to haul watch the line and haul away
 

blackdiamond296

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I think this comes down to how often you anchor up and how often you anchor up alone. If you only anchor up 3 times a season, in places where you have room to run the ball then I think it's the more straightforward way and you could free up space by removing the hauler.

On the flip side, if you anchor a lot or anchor alone a lot, then a hauler is the deal.

As far as using your less than knowledgable crew, as long as they're able bodied enough to haul in the line they'll be useful enough.

As far as your chances of getting line in the prop- I think you'd have to screw the pooch pretty good with either method to do that, so I wouldn't make it one of your deciding factors.
 

steveinak

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Just looking for opinions on hauling an anchor with the use of a hauler vs. use of an anchor ball or by hand.

I had a discussion with an experienced captain who told me that if I choose to use the hauler (located at the helm) I run the risk of wrapping my anchor line in the prop, mainly because once the anchor breaks loose current could easily force the anchor under the boat.
Guy doesn't know what he's talking about ! Just use those red & black balls on your dash to move the boat away from the line while your hauling the anchor.

Claims that it would be safer to use the anchor ball method.

To add to the discussion, I often fish alone or with inexperienced people, who may not be able to assist in pulling the anchor. The boat is a 28' downeast.
I always fish alone and don't even go on my bow to anchor up, all done next to my hauler, i have a "riding line" that goes from my bow post to just behind my hauler, i set the anchor back out the scope i need then tie in the riding line to the anchor line with a rolling hitch then just let out more line till it comes tight. To haul i just power up the line till i can untie the rolling hitch put the anchor line in the block & hauler and wind her up till the chain hits the plates.

What are your opinions?

One of the main reasons I ask is because I'm considering removal of the hauler which I don't use for any other reason. Just don't want to regret that decision either.

DO NOT Remove the hauler you'll be sorry !!!
 

Toolate

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Anyone run one of these?

Vetus Napoleon Hydraulic Anchor Windlass

Its hydraulic.

Sounds like the common issue is offshore fishing and the overall length of line to be brought up. Cant imagine any anchor locker comfortably taking any more than say 3-400' at most plus think of all the water in that line that is going to then drip/evaporate out into your boat.
 

cb34

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Hauler

No brainer, you all ready have the hauler on the boat:D
 

hntrss

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If you fish seriously, there is no better way than a hauler. Also, comparing an electradyne, or even better a hydraulic hauler to a windlass is a joke. Windlass is a toy, a hauler is a tool. This is my first electric hauler, always used hydraulic. I was a little apprehensive at first, but it is a very capable unit for what I do. Installation is simple, doesn't use much space. That being said, hydraulic is still head and shoulders, stronger, faster and more durable. This is a pretty common layout for double anchoring bottom fishing:

huntress taggin 029.jpg
 

paddyboy

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Anchor hauling

I throw the anchor hundreds of times in the course of my season. Hauler makes me a better fisherman.

image.jpg
 

paddyboy

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Chock on the rail alongside the house holding the line and fair leading it to the bow chock. Time to haul back, run up on the linearity the boat, grab it with the gaff, chuck it in the hauler and get it up.

image.jpg
 

Linesiders

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Thanks for the great responses, gut is saying to keep the hauler, I'd probably regret not having it in the future.

Any other tips regarding technique welcome. Anything else to consider? I have no experience with one, just know to keep my hands clear.

Is it best to run forward slowly as the hauler pulls in the line or just load the hauler and allow it to pull the boat to the hook. Use the davit arm or just go direct off the hauler?

I probably just need to start using it and stop overthinking it, but appreciate the responses.
 

jwalka51

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Deffinatly practice using your hauler if you have no experiance with one. It can be a very dangerous implement in the hands of an inexperienced operater. But once you are fully aware of its operations and the limits of its capabilities, it will be your best friend. I think that steves response was the best and most straight forward one. Both the part about running the boat clear of the line, and the part about the riding line.
I also use a riding line when I anchor up, But mine is a little different. I have a pulley on my bow post that I run the riding line through and double it back to the cockpit, then there is a snatch block on one end that I can just snap over the anchor line. After that I just haul the riding line until it draws the block all the way up to the other block, then cleat off the riding line and anchor line. It is a very effective method. And the best part is that you never have to climb up onto the bow and run the risk of falling over. Especially when you are alone.

To sum it all up, deffinatly dont get rid of the hauler.
 
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