Help with tools, time and materials list for rebuild of transom, stringers and deck

LuSea

Commander
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Posts
252
Likes
291
Location
Clinton CT.
First Name
Tom
Boat Make
Nauset 35
I would absolutely leave the outer skin. Do all your demo inside the boat, use whatever tools necessary.
I think the transom replacement is the easiest part of the job you are looking at, you just want to make sure you get good contact between your core and the fiberglass outer skin.

You will need clamps of varying sizes, and wedges that you can brace against something to hold the lower portion of the transom in place.
Coosa, hull & deck putty, vinylester laminating resin , use the “screw thru” clamping method then remove screws after cure and fill with H&D. Warm weather over 65degrees or tent and constant heat until cured. 70 degrees would be ideal. As said , leave the outer skin if possible , clean , prime with laminating resin and layer up the Coosa with H&D . Next day back at it to layer up the inboard glass work , maintain the heat to cure and done. Talk to Joe, he’ll set you on the correct path.
 

Islandlure

Lieutenant Commander
Joined
Feb 20, 2012
Posts
239
Likes
252
Location
Jamestown, RI
Boat Make
Harris 36
I just went through this process myself. Cut inside skin out, remove core, re-laminated 1/2 inch cosa board and 7 layers of glass. Just like said previously heat up the surface while your getting things together ( I ended up turning the heat way down while we did the layup ) glass and hit with the heat for about an hour. We did 30cc of hardener to a qt of poly resin.

IMG_5448.jpg
 

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
2,290
Likes
1,332
Age
51
Location
New England
IMO if you didn't have your May deadline to go fishing i'd say go for it and do it yourself. I ain't the greatest with glass but i muddle by and it always seems to take twice as long as i think it will take me to do the job. The name Chuck Desteffino(sp) comes up on here quite a bit a call to him might get you a spot with him to get the job done in time. Maybe just grind your deck & hull sides back a bit all around and tape the cracks up for the season then get all the materials & some sort of shed built to do the job next winter.
Winner winner chicken dinner. Life has kind of sucked over the past three months and no progress has been made other than to fashion a hoist to get the motor off. So taping the seams and kicking the can down the road till after striper season seems like the way to go.

Anyone have any recommendations on what to use to seal these cracks up?

IMG_1950.jpg

IMG_1951.jpg

IMG_1952.jpg

IMG_1956.jpg

IMG_1957.jpg
 

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
2,290
Likes
1,332
Age
51
Location
New England
I think it might be unavoidable to rip up at least one deck panel/section because its so soft that its flexes when you step on it and you can see in the last picture its swelled and bowed up a half inch higher than the more solid panel to the right which is only two years old.
 

novivin

Captain
Lite User
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
978
Likes
492
Location
southcoast, MA
Last edited:

Brooksie

Rear Admiral
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Posts
2,282
Likes
1,476
Location
Cape Cod
Boat Make
Bruno-Stillman 35
IMHO, decks should always be made up of 2 layers w/ staggered joints especially if they are crowned. Maybe butting or scabbing panels works but it never has for me.
 

CCtuna

Rear Admiral
Joined
Oct 20, 2012
Posts
1,900
Likes
1,552
Location
Nauset
Boat Make
Some day...
That’s got to be some of the worse deck rotting I’ve ever seen. To me that looks like plywood laid down and gel coated with zero glass. I’ve never seen a deck look like that. I would replace those sections for sure, looks like you could rip them up with a butter knife
 

tsharac

Commander
Joined
May 9, 2012
Posts
321
Likes
212
Location
Alexandria/Parksley, VA
First Name
Tim
Boat Make
1976 20' Eastporter; 1976 16' Stratford dory
How about you skip this year's striper season and use the warm weather to tackle the deck, stringers, and transom? Do it right and enjoy it for years to come.
 

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
2,290
Likes
1,332
Age
51
Location
New England
How about you skip this year's striper season and use the warm weather to tackle the deck, stringers, and transom? Do it right and enjoy it for years to come.
That would be the smart thing to do. But I don’t have that kind of self restraint.
 

novivin

Captain
Lite User
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
978
Likes
492
Location
southcoast, MA

harpoon83

Captain
Joined
Oct 4, 2011
Posts
872
Likes
750
Location
Groveland, Ma
First Name
Colin
I agree with the above, from those pictures it looks like there isn't any glass on those panels. Looks like painted or gel-coat on top of bare plywood.

The way those seems cracked there is zero glass on the seems at least, and the checking in the plywood indicated that the entire sheet of plywood has no glass on it.

I know you have grand plans for all the work you want to do when you do the decks.

But you could at least repair the back deck of the boat, put a tank under the deck, I forget if that was in your plan or not.

That would not take very long at all, if you skip all the fancy shit that you have in your head.

I would also make a decision soon, and order materials if you decide to attempt some sort of repairs before the season starts.
 

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
2,290
Likes
1,332
Age
51
Location
New England
I think my boat might have ribs but no stringers. This is a pic of a David Smith boat and I saw another pic of a smaller boat, looked to be 22' like mine, that was constructed the same. If the boat doesn't need the longitudinal stiffness of stringers (not sure if that's the right term) then maybe replacing the deck and ribs well be easier than I thought?

1650543733355.png
 

novivin

Captain
Lite User
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
978
Likes
492
Location
southcoast, MA

novivin

Captain
Lite User
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
978
Likes
492
Location
southcoast, MA

harpoon83

Captain
Joined
Oct 4, 2011
Posts
872
Likes
750
Location
Groveland, Ma
First Name
Colin
I know that if I spent half the time that I am sitting on this forum actually working on my skiff project it would be done by now.

Open a hatch or cut a hole in the deck and see what's under there for structure. Another thought, the longer that you let it wait...the more stuff you will have to replace.

Maybe the structure is still solid under there, or maybe it is already rotted out and will need to be replaced....only one way to find out.
 

leaky

Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
5,067
Likes
2,896
Location
NH
If you find your boat isn't being destroyed as a result of structural or semi structural failure, you could lay down some 1/4 plywood over the whole deck, being sure to orient the seems elsewhere, hastily adhere it to what's there using something cheap, paint it with any old oil paint and nonskid mixed in. $300 in materials or something - then for fuck sake rip up that deck come September.
 

Latest Posts

Top Bottom