I'm confused, had some of the best scallops I've had in a long time, and they didn't come from Georges...

Roccus7

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They came from JAPAN!!! Found them at the local Hannafords, was lured in to a pile of huge, cream-colored scallops, and then saw the price of $11.97/lb, which is $16 less per lb than the local ones they had a week ago. The sad part is that the local, Georges ones I assume, were the pale white color which doesn't bode well, so I wasn't at all interested in buying them, especially at that price.

Once I realized the scallops today were from Japan I started to balk, but they looked so good and they were "Wild Caught", so I figured WTH. Fast forward to dinner tonight, and they tasted even better than they looked!! Some of the best I've had in years. HTH can they bring in such a magnificent product at such a low price?

To add insult to injury, there were swordfish fillets from Viet Nam for $12.99/lb. They looked good, but were definitely from small fish, damn shame about that.

With quality products like these, and these low prices, things are not looking good for our fisherman, unless these are holiday "come in and shop here" prices.
 

novivin

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Roccus7

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I buy local FRESH seafood. Not ratty product. Why should I take a hit in the gut? Or possibly a long ride on the porcelain bus at the same time???
That used to be my mantra while living on LI, NY, but A 27 year stint in Northern Illinois forced me to remove the "local" part of that sentence. Of course the "FRESH" caused me great financial pain. At least the fish mongers at the only seafood store worth visiting realized I knew what was what, when they commented, "You always seem to choose the freshest fish we have."

Upon moving back here, I rekindled the old "Local" caveat. Today's event was a very sobering event, but if correctly labeled, the product today was damn close to local day boat scallops dragged inshore in my local area that I picked up when the boat docked a couple of years ago. The fact that it has flown over 5700 nmi to get here in such magnificent shape, and at such a low price, is quite disconcerting. Houston we have a problem...
 

plowin

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I am not gonna bitch about shitty fish prices here in the US and then buy fish form a half a million miles away. I feel better being disgruntled about the lack of support and ex vessel price for my locally caught fish when I resist buying out of country seafood. I am committed to the seafood products caught in our waters given a choice between foreign caught and locally caught. I know way too many people who have been let down by our own county’s lack of support for there efforts at sea. In the grand scheme it does not cost much more than a tank of overpriced gasoline.
 

novivin

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novivin

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Gobottomfish

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Why don’t local fish mongers post country of origin when asking big $ for fish, scallops, etc? I want to support local fisheries, but need accurate source info to do so.
 

plowin

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Why don’t local fish mongers post country of origin when asking big $ for fish, scallops, etc? I want to support local fisheries, but need accurate source info to do so.
Great point. Dave Marciano is really onto something I believe with his Angelica Fisheries fish market. Look it up
 

Capecodfisherman

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I haven’t seen the Japanese stuff before but the local stuff was probably trip boat caught, I would never buy that stuff. After a few days on ice they get slimy, can’t imagine a 10 day old scallop looks good. There’s a lot of day boats around New England that sell their catch direct to consumer at fair prices, track them down and that will be the best scallop you’ve ever had guaranteed.
 

Roccus7

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I haven’t seen the Japanese stuff before but the local stuff was probably trip boat caught, I would never buy that stuff. After a few days on ice they get slimy, can’t imagine a 10 day old scallop looks good. There’s a lot of day boats around New England that sell their catch direct to consumer at fair prices, track them down and that will be the best scallop you’ve ever had guaranteed.
Guess message wasn't clear. I USUALLY get day boat scallops, calling the local Co-Op to find out if the boats are out and when they're coming in. The local boats don't fish Georges, but inshore spots during the Maine season which starts in December. When I get local ones, I'll freeze up a year's worth.

And for context, I grew up on LI, NY and dragged my own bay scallops every year back in the day when they actually had a season, so I know what a good scallop looks and tastes like.

These Japanese scallops were equivalent in taste to local day boat sea scallops which shocked me, uniformly larger than locals, and all cream colored; wasn't single white one in the bunch. Due to uniformity in size and color, I'm wondering if they weren't farmed, even though the sign said "Wild Caught".

Their physical beauty was the reason I bought them, and at $11.97/lb, I figured if they didn't measure up, it wouldn't be an overly expensive epic fail. Figuring they were probably pretty "junk", I was going to deep fry, but The Admiral wanted them seared, and what the Admiral wants, the Admiral gets. SO glad I seared them to enjoy their sublime taste, they couldn't have been any better.

Just the facts Ma'am... A very puzzling, and disturbing, scenario...
 

Capecodfisherman

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Guess message wasn't clear. I USUALLY get day boat scallops, calling the local Co-Op to find out if the boats are out and when they're coming in. The local boats don't fish Georges, but inshore spots during the Maine season which starts in December. When I get local ones, I'll freeze up a year's worth.

And for context, I grew up on LI, NY and dragged my own bay scallops every year back in the day when they actually had a season, so I know what a good scallop looks and tastes like.

These Japanese scallops were equivalent in taste to local day boat sea scallops which shocked me, uniformly larger than locals, and all cream colored; wasn't single white one in the bunch. Due to uniformity in size and color, I'm wondering if they weren't farmed, even though the sign said "Wild Caught".

Their physical beauty was the reason I bought them, and at $11.97/lb, I figured if they didn't measure up, it wouldn't be an overly expensive epic fail. Figuring they were probably pretty "junk", I was going to deep fry, but The Admiral wanted them seared, and what the Admiral wants, the Admiral gets. SO glad I seared them to enjoy their sublime taste, they couldn't have been any better.

Just the facts Ma'am... A very puzzling, and disturbing, scenario...
Right, wasn’t specifically calling you out. was more so just broadcasting the message. I scallop year round on my dayboat. I would think at that price point they are farmed. Who knows, mis labeling of seafood is a very big problem.
 

PatriciaLynn

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Guess message wasn't clear. I USUALLY get day boat scallops, calling the local Co-Op to find out if the boats are out and when they're coming in. The local boats don't fish Georges, but inshore spots during the Maine season which starts in December. When I get local ones, I'll freeze up a year's worth.

And for context, I grew up on LI, NY and dragged my own bay scallops every year back in the day when they actually had a season, so I know what a good scallop looks and tastes like.

These Japanese scallops were equivalent in taste to local day boat sea scallops which shocked me, uniformly larger than locals, and all cream colored; wasn't single white one in the bunch. Due to uniformity in size and color, I'm wondering if they weren't farmed, even though the sign said "Wild Caught".

Their physical beauty was the reason I bought them, and at $11.97/lb, I figured if they didn't measure up, it wouldn't be an overly expensive epic fail. Figuring they were probably pretty "junk", I was going to deep fry, but The Admiral wanted them seared, and what the Admiral wants, the Admiral gets. SO glad I seared them to enjoy their sublime taste, they couldn't have been any better.

Just the facts Ma'am... A very puzzling, and disturbing, scenario...
Probably farm raised. We have a sister prefecture over in Japan that we share information back and forth with on aquaculture. They grow some incredible scallops over there.
 

PatriciaLynn

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One of the things to remember is that American culture by and large doesn't value fish and seafood in the same way that many other countries do. In France, oysters are a necessity around the holidays and people appreciate them in a way completely different than here. In Italy, fish is deeply cemented in the culture, even to the point where eating fish is a part of Catholicism. The Japanese and many other Asian countries are fanatical about quality seafood.

Our market here in the US drives what we get. We ship out the premium stuff to the people who value (ie will pay for) it and import cheaper alternatives for the fish stick crowd. I know many on here understand and appreciate quality seafood, but there are a LOT of people in the US that don't.
 

goin4broke

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Probably why recreational fishing is so popular among people who do crave fish. The only product I buy that I can’t catch myself comes from a market in stonington, ct. They post tags of origin in the display case.
 

Pedlyr

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One of the things to remember is that American culture by and large doesn't value fish and seafood in the same way that many other countries do. In France, oysters are a necessity around the holidays and people appreciate them in a way completely different than here. In Italy, fish is deeply cemented in the culture, even to the point where eating fish is a part of Catholicism. The Japanese and many other Asian countries are fanatical about quality seafood.

Our market here in the US drives what we get. We ship out the premium stuff to the people who value (ie will pay for) it and import cheaper alternatives for the fish stick crowd. I know many on here understand and appreciate quality seafood, but there are a LOT of people in the US that don't.
Ever wonder how the boat can get $20 a pound but the store sells them for $18? Because the scallops are soaked in tripoly and water and gain weight and shelf life. And it makes for a crappy product but the price is king for most consumers.
BTW many scallops in the US come from Southern New England and the mid Atlantic regions
 

Canyondiver

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I rarely buy any seafood from a market.

If that happens, it’s a specialty place where price is a premium as is the fish.

The local places here would scare crabs away if you used product for bait.

Discouraging!
 

Capecodfisherman

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Ever wonder how the boat can get $20 a pound but the store sells them for $18? Because the scallops are soaked in tripoly and water and gain weight and shelf life. And it makes for a crappy product but the price is king for most consumers.
BTW many scallops in the US come from Southern New England and the mid Atlantic regions
I think the stuff you primarily see in the grocery store is the 20/30 and they aren’t getting 20 bucks for those. But I think you are totally right on soaking them up with chemicals. Maybe some 1020 from
George’s, but the price has been in the shitter since the spring. Guys been getting 12 bucks for a while now.
 


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