Installing windows

TRUE NORTH

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Im getting new wynne windows and wondering what you guys have used to put yours in. On the website it says to use 1) Butyl rubber tape 2) Double stick closed cell foam tape 3) 100% silicone rubber sealant. opinons are appreciated
Thanks
 

steveinak

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I just did some plexi windows and used butyl tape(first time) worked really well and pulled around the curves nicely. Bought it on fleabay 7.50 a roll plus freight. I wanted black so it would look like the black rubber gasket style windows.
1 1/2" x 1/8" x 50' Black Butyl Tape









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F/V First Team

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Butyl rubber for the win!

After you install the windows, on the next warm day take another quarter turn or so on your screws, should seal the windows down for the rest of their life with no issues. Be sure that you overlap the tape a bit when you make your way around the frame and always have that seam on the bottom of the window just to be sure.
 

F/V First Team

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A razor blade works great trimming the excess that squeezes out beyond the frame.

On a related note: when the windows are being trimmed on a big sport fish that has four windows across the wind screen, 3 large windows down both sides, two on the winter back and two more on the sliding doors - the excess trimmings make quite a large ball. When said ball is hurled towards the young boy, who just got off the school bus and is walking through the shop to see what's going on, it makes quite the impact. Cue laughter. Then duck when the projectile comes zipping back through the air. Fun times in the shop, fun times indeed.
 

Raider Ronnie

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Crabman

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When you cut the window out of a cored top, do you remove some of the core and fill the void with some type of filler?
 

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Well, I don't know about the other guys, but I use Special Tool #76 to layout the basic outlines for the bottom of the windshield windows as well as the outboard verticals, including the corner windows, and then just the straight edge method for the center verticals and the tops. On the side windows the straight edge is used to establish the tops and bottoms, keeping in mind the line of sight for the windscreen so it looks awesome aesthetically, as far as the length of the windows that falls into two different considerations. 1.) The curvature of the pilot house. 2.) The total length of the pilot house. The vertical space between windows is constant when regarded to the pillars of the windshield so that the boat is balanced, keeping that aesthetic that pleases the eye.

So, once everything is roughed out with pencil/china marker/etc the tape comes out establishing straight lines of sight on all of the outside points of the windows, correcting any waiver that is in the pilot house due to conflicting angles and radiuses. The corners are marked off and established with a 3 inch radius (six inch circle) since this is the maximum that the window manufacturers can do. When everything looks perfect, you just take seven simple measurements. See photo. The seventh measurement is simply the thickness of the material. You make all measurements to the corners of the window shape, just make sure that your radiuses are mentioned in your notes.

And there you go, give them the measurements and they make the windows, when you get the windows in they are so close you can probably just cut out your openings and call it good, although it is a good practice to put the window up in place and trace it with a magic marker or something contrasting the original layout.

window.jpg
 

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Cored tops sure are a blast. Yank out the window cut-outs and put them in a pile for later. Slap Special Tool #84 into the hole shooter and have at the coring, tearing and rending it free from its plastic prison. Be sure to chew out any bedding compound too, making extra sure that you clean out all the bits and pieces and try your hardest not to damage the laminate or the finished surfaces. Toss some tape on the edges (or if you're a rebel, free hand this part) and mix up some resin kicked slightly light so your hot coat penetrates fully into the exposed core material. Go around the entire window cutout, starting with the overhead. Be sure to keep your brush lightly saturated, resin all over yourself just looks silly, be sure to jab all up in that sucker and really good in the corners. When you get done with all of your hot coating mix up some hull and deck putty and pound that stuff into the gap, be sure to start with the same window you started hot coating, if you go backwards there is a chance that the putty will slip out of the space due to the slippery hot coat. Make sure to treat your edges as you putty, there will be less grinding if you do. When done correctly, some hot coating resin will flow across the top of your putty sealing it up quite nicely and the putty should hollow slightly so all you need to do is hit it with some hand paper to knock off the high spots. Your window should fit in the hole with little issue. usually the biggest problem is when you turn a corner with the jig saw and the blade travels some, but a few smacks with a rasp or an angle grinder and you're back in business. Always dry fit your window first, so if you need any quick adjustments you can make them on the fly.
 

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If you're comfortable with a skill saw, the kickback most people encounter might be enough to tumble them off the washrail, or at the very least drop the tool (which has a whirling blade of death btw). I prefer the jigsaw, just fire it up with the blade parallel to your piece, then slowly lead into the material to cut a hole, works great.
 

traditions

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If you have a decent jigsaw,you can do the whole cut with that.Its amazing how much better a quality tool works.If the windows are large you could use a circular saw.The window frame will cover the cut anyway.I bought a Ryobi jig saw for a second saw,and it doesn't cut as good as the Makita or the bosch.
 

Montauk Rocket

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This is why I love this site!

Very generous sharing of info and experience from the top guys in the business.

:thumbsup
 
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I remember my first plunge cut with a skill saw. Couldn't have been more than 7 or 8. Needed to cut this balsa cored panel my father laid up for something, maybe it was a table top or a settee.

The new shop was so different than the single bay with a loft, all the smells were gone; the wood, the turpentine, the linseed oil, that wonderful bitter sweet smell of resin back in the 80's, the fruity smell from open pails of gelcoat too close to the furnace outlet. Even the soft musk of wood smoke as absent in that new metal titan. Propped up atop of a few saw horses I held in my had this HUGE (to me at the time) Porter Cable, the jagged teeth of the blade glinting at me in the sunlight. Specks of paint clinging to the metal polished smooth by countless cuts through fiberglass and wood.

The panel couldn't have been more than inch thick max, but I was terrified that something was going to happen with this saw I clutched in my hands with white knuckles. I am sure I flinched at first when I pulled that trigger back for the first time. The whine of the motor growing with intensity until it was roaring wide open. I pushed down with probably more force than was needed on the front of the guide, pushing the nose hard into the surface of that panel; making sure that the guide was right against my line since I only had the one shot at this and I didn't want to mess up. Pulling the guard back to expose those teeth I envisioned something akin to the belt sander mishap a few days earlier. I didn't check to see if some joker had the trigger locked before I plugged it in. Of course off it went with me hanging onto the power cord. Once I dusted myself off, face red with embarrassment, I made a promise to myself to always check triggers from then on (something that saved my hands more than once over the years I am sure, damn routers). As those whirling teeth slowly made their way down towards the surface I made sure I had a firm grip, I didn't want to be hanging onto this saw as we tore across the surface of the panel and over the edge of the loft onto the concrete so far below. With a puff of dust I was through the exterior and before I knew it, all the way through the panel and making my way up across the mark so skillfully laid out in front of me. The rest as they say, was history. It wasn't until many years later when the saw did finally kick at me. The culprit? A knot in a piece of pressure treated that I was cutting for a school project.

Who would have thought?

Nothing removes material quite like a skill saw, but it's something that comes with practice. Once you master this invaluable tool you can do arcs, curves and even circles with it. Although sometimes they WILL catch on fire (talk about exciting) but you can just blow that out, let it rest for a minute or two and keep going.

If you can't do it with a skill saw maybe you should take a giant step back and reconsider just exactly what you're doing. Go carbide or go home.

And of course; when in doubt, get the chainsaw out :D
 

Crabman

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Cored tops sure are a blast. Yank out the window cut-outs and put them in a pile for later. Slap Special Tool #84 into the hole shooter and have at the coring, tearing and rending it free from its plastic prison. Be sure to chew out any bedding compound too, making extra sure that you clean out all the bits and pieces and try your hardest not to damage the laminate or the finished surfaces. Toss some tape on the edges (or if you're a rebel, free hand this part) and mix up some resin kicked slightly light so your hot coat penetrates fully into the exposed core material. Go around the entire window cutout, starting with the overhead. Be sure to keep your brush lightly saturated, resin all over yourself just looks silly, be sure to jab all up in that sucker and really good in the corners. When you get done with all of your hot coating mix up some hull and deck putty and pound that stuff into the gap, be sure to start with the same window you started hot coating, if you go backwards there is a chance that the putty will slip out of the space due to the slippery hot coat. Make sure to treat your edges as you putty, there will be less grinding if you do. When done correctly, some hot coating resin will flow across the top of your putty sealing it up quite nicely and the putty should hollow slightly so all you need to do is hit it with some hand paper to knock off the high spots. Your window should fit in the hole with little issue. usually the biggest problem is when you turn a corner with the jig saw and the blade travels some, but a few smacks with a rasp or an angle grinder and you're back in business. Always dry fit your window first, so if you need any quick adjustments you can make them on the fly.

Would this be the same for balsa and nida cores. I have a balsa core that I will be cutting. I don't have tool #84 but I've used a nail. Of course, the nail was custom bent to exact standards. Is the touch-up gel coat for when the nail jumps out of the two layers glass and chops divots into the surface? I will be putting in framed windows. Is there a need for touch up? I thought I might be able to hide the lack of experience.
 

Overkill

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A couple swipes with a 1/2 inch router bit in cordless drill make short work of it. Let the shaft ride on the glass and hang on.
 
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