Key issues to have a surveyor focus on with a Volvo TAMD41-p powered 2005 Fortier 26?

mbsl98

Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 18, 2021
Posts
43
Likes
16
First Name
Mike
I am about to get a survey done on a 2005 Fortier 26, and curious if there any particular points that I should be sure are covered? I assume a good surveyor will do the usual array of checks, and the Fortier is not a particularly complex boat, but there are probably some particular spots to cover. Power is a low hour Volvo TAMD41-p. It is an estate, so I don't think there will be many maintenance records, although it appears to be very well maintained with a lot of recent electronic upgrades and a very knowledgeable prior owner
 

artodea

Lieutenant
Lite User
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Posts
43
Likes
43
Location
Amesbury, MA
Boat Make
Fortier 26

mbsl98

Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 18, 2021
Posts
43
Likes
16
First Name
Mike
Congrats on the new boat. You will absolutely love it.

A good surveyor running through the usual array of checks is all you need. The Fortier 26 is a solid boat and the foam core buildup is not at all prone to degradation from moisture incursion, but if there was any damage/repair a good surveyor can spot it and assess it. Your surveyor will not likely get into the engine. Low hours is good, but it can also be bad on a diesel. Sign up at boatdiesel.com and brush up on the TAMD41. You can also get a diesel mechanic to survey the engine and be present at the sea trial for piece of mind.

Good luck!
Thanks. I’m not sure just what a mechanic can look at without taking things apart. Underway, I assume it is listening, interpreting guage readings, engine idle and wide open RPMs, etc, but just that doesn’t seem to need a mechanic versus surveyor and a somewhat knowledgable buyer?
 

PatriciaLynn

Rear Admiral
Joined
Jul 18, 2017
Posts
1,445
Likes
1,377
Location
Cape E
Boat Make
Repco
That was a very prolific series of engine. I have one currently and have fished on several boats with these engines. Overall, I have really liked them. They put out a fair bit of power for 3.4l so checking the raw water pump and conditions of the oil cooler, jacket water cooler and aftercooler is very important. If you have a failure of the raw water cooling it won't take long to cause serious damage.

Aside from that to be aware of, I have had good luck. Mine is run between 26-3000 rpm and has over 12k hours on it. Running it harder will impact the life expectancy. The P engines don't smoke like the A's and B's do. Be thankful for that, those engines smoked terribly.
 

mbsl98

Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 18, 2021
Posts
43
Likes
16
First Name
Mike
Like to hear that. I like low hours in powerboats because it usually means the whole boat and gear is lightly used. Low hour motors in sailboats are common and can be very negative. Need to run them harder and longer than just motoring out of harbor, but many don’t bother.
 

Corazon

Lieutenant Commander
Lite User
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Posts
130
Likes
113
Location
Freeport NY
First Name
Doug
Boat Make
Duffy 35
Last edited:

mbsl98

Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 18, 2021
Posts
43
Likes
16
First Name
Mike
The boat is an awesome ‘simple’ boat. Rod built it not to break (no wipers, fuel gauges etc) as mentioned in the FB group.

if you find things wrong it does not mean you have to walk away - if they can be repaired adjust price. My Fortier was in Florida and unused- that was the eventual repower reason - lots of corrosion from lack of use - cooling system, turbo etc. I knew that when buying it after sea trials etc

A surveyor will go through the below (you can also call Fortier)

I sold my 84 last year - the boat was still 100% solid but I maintained it. I repowered in 2001 w the TAMD41P.

Look for anything installed after factory - esp through the hull since its cored. Check electrical / is it original (which is fine) or if modified was it thoughtfully done. Most likely the fresh water does not work - no big deal and I never had mine working.

look at thru hulls.- make sure they work etc.

if the deck should be solid - check screws for water infusion.

Head Gaskets were the most pervasive failure on the TAMD41P (mine had to be replaced - weeping) Turbos over time. Check the oil pan - I went through 3 before we finally coated it to prevent salt water corrosion. The pan sits low in the bilge.

check fuel valves - this is one thing I was not a fan of. Factory is on the lip of the rear hatch - which leaks into the bilge. I replaced that hatch w an aluminum one.

if the motor stays at temperature at WOT (hold a bit over 200 on the gauge) that’s good - they are sensitive to a clean cooling system. RPM specs were given in the FB group.

Look for leaks on the motor and gear. Clean bilge (common sense)

The gear is likely a LH 1.96:1 HS1. Check the housing for corrosion - mine had to be replaced as well due to corrosion (that is a more challenging part to get).

Be aware the engine has been out of production for a while - parts are generally easy to get except for less replaced ones (eg gear housing) - you can still find them if you hunt.

It’s a great boat - best in class IMO - I only sold mine bc I needed bigger.

great luck to you!
Great info.My target is a 2005, and acquired by current knowledgable owner in 2014. It has been unused this season due to his death in Spring so the unused risks should be reasonable - fingers crossed. I have names of 2 surveyors recommended through a surveyor on here that is also a F26 owner, although the surveyor may not know Fortiers.
 

Toolate

Admiral
Joined
Aug 6, 2013
Posts
6,555
Likes
2,478
Location
Southwestern CT
First Name
Ben
Boat Make
1998 36' Sabre Express CAT 3116TA's, 2015 ROS Scotia 16 Etec 50
If I’m not mistaken the cockpit floor is plywood as the core while the rest of the boat is airex. I would take a close look at any penetrations in that cockpit floor looking for water intrusion and rotten core.
 

Kailua Kid

Captain
Joined
Jan 14, 2019
Posts
606
Likes
430
Location
Bainbridge Island
Website
www.gibbonslawgroup.com
Boat Make
General Marine 26; Klamath 19; Sparkman & Stephens Yankee 38 sloop
Thanks. I’m not sure just what a mechanic can look at without taking things apart. Underway, I assume it is listening, interpreting guage readings, engine idle and wide open RPMs, etc, but just that doesn’t seem to need a mechanic versus surveyor and a somewhat knowledgable buyer?
Having a qualified Volvo mechanic aboard for the sea-trial or to otherwise evaluate the condition of the engine can be a very good idea, especially in the absence of maintenance and repair records. I avoided what would have been an engine replacement soon after purchase by having such a technician run diagnostics during the sea-trial and then send an oil and coolant sample off for analysis. Considering the cost of replacing that Volvo would have been half to two-thirds the asking price for the boat (a GM 26), I was very glad to have arranged for the evaluation. There were a couple of warning signs that I likely would have picked up on my own, having been around diesels since childhood, but having the Volvo-specific information and immediate estimate of the cost to make the necessary repairs and or replace the engine ended up being very useful.
 

Gurryman

Rear Admiral
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Posts
1,423
Likes
1,170
Location
New Bedford MA
First Name
Mark
Boat Make
Nauset 28
If I’m not mistaken the cockpit floor is plywood as the core while the rest of the boat is airex. I would take a close look at any penetrations in that cockpit floor looking for water intrusion and rotten core.
Fortier switched to foam core in the cockpit in 1989
 

Gurryman

Rear Admiral
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Posts
1,423
Likes
1,170
Location
New Bedford MA
First Name
Mark
Boat Make
Nauset 28
When I had my 86 and I spoke with Rod Fortier and inquired when they changed to foam? he said 1989
 
Top Bottom