Mechanical vs electronic engine for repower

Genius

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outboards.... :D
...speaking of outboards. I sunk a sled trying to cross a ice pond. Dragged it out with another sled, took the exhaust off and plugs, rolled it over and pulled the cord a few times.....I was back riding my 2 stroke carbureted sled in an hour and a half. Don't think an electronic engine could do that.
 

pennh2o

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How many hours do you have on the Volvo? What parts have you had to purchase and what are the prices for similar parts from another engine manufacturer?
I have 7000 hrs. Just off the top of my head I had to purchase a turbo for $2550, a RPM sensor for $300, seawater pumps $1100. I going to get my injectors pop tested, a replacement nozzle is $150 and a new injector is $400 plus. I’ve compared parts with other companies and it’s not even close for most parts
 

WoundUpMarine

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Diesel Jerry

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Keelboater

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The future is always just around the corner. Nothing beats the torque of an electric motor. So what happens when we finally get to the point when range is no longer an issue? :p Never say never. Then there's hydrogen to think of as well................maybe even phytoplankton propulsion some day. ;) So yeah, I went electronic with the QSB 480, and will have a really nice mechanical 260HP CAT 3208 up for sale once I find the time to get that new turbo installed. But for now I have the blinders on to keep me focused on my boat project. I have full confidence in the electronic Cummins, but in the end it's just another motor that requires maintenance. So I'll be sure to have the right tools on hand for the job, just like I would for any other motor I constantly rely on.
 

WoundUpMarine

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richard c welk iv

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I have zero experience with marine diesels so maybe you shouldn't read any farther but after iron working dried up for me in the early seventies I became a truck driver until I retired in 2018 . These are my experiences . I would agree the older diesels were smoky and loud and not very efficient . I drove a 16/71 Detroit where I sincerely believe I suffered nerve damage from that engine . The one thing that engine did though was it ran consistently and I can not remember it ever being down for repair . And don't forget that these had air starters and all it took was a loss of air and it could /would not start . All the mechanical engines I operated of that era performed the same with little or no down time as a result of engine failure . And it was common to to have fleets with trucks with over a million miles in them .

The first exposure I had to an electric motor was a Caterpillar 3406e which I immediately hated because it was a dog and spent a good portion of it's life in the shop for one thing or another and we are not talking about changing a fan belt . A side note here is that due to pollution requirements Caterpillar no longer makes engines for the road . At the end of my career I drove for Ryder Dedicated Logistics in a Freightliner with a electric Detroit . This is a very popular combination with trucking fleets and I can only assume because that combo is cheap . I can say this without fear of contradiction that Ryders main yard in Hartford Connecticut employs a full time mechanic ( OMG I mean TECHNICIAN ) whose only job eight hours a day is to work on computer related issues and when he wasn't working ( very rarely ) he was being retrained on new systems . You almost had to get an appointment for him to look at your truck and if your problem was computer related he was the ONLY person qualified / trained to diagnose it . In the old days if you could pull a wrench you were qualified .

The other issue I found troubling was if the computer couldn't tell the tech the problem he had absolutely no clue what to do as he lacked the experience to continue . I would gravitate to the older hands that had been there a while for the younger ones were dropping like flies . With these engines ( in my case ) all it took was for one sensor to malfunction to shut the engine down and it might literally take days in some cases to find that sensor . Now you might say didn't they give you a loaner truck in the mean time and I will tell you that in most cases the truck they gave you was worst than the truck you drove everyday . I can only imagine that the standards for road engines are different from off road meaning I believe off road might be more lenient and it's possible my understanding here is wrong .

I will tell you that it is federal law that a technician has to sign off on any work he has completed . I wish I had a dollar for every time I picked up my truck studied the repair slip with the techs signature just to find out nothing had been done . They were so over whelmed with work that they could not keep up with the volume and I was told it was only going to get worse ( which is why so many techs were leaving ) with the introduction of the newer motors .

Let me end with this . I do not know what it's like to pull pots or drag for fish but I have to believe that there are constants in this life regardless of profession . When I went to work I had to make a days pay and you are not going to do that being constantly broke down . Yes these newer motors are efficient and quiet and less polluting and I will give them that but I believe the process employed to achieve all of the above is very complicated and prone to failure . Maybe you own one that has never had a problem and if that's the case good for you . Remember I never had to pay for repairs and I do not what I would have done had I owned my own truck . Intent and outcome . You may have the noblest of intent but the outcome may be not so much .
 
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I will say that with electronic controls and engines you do need to keep batteries and their connections well maintained. ZF took on Mathers and all the time we would get this service call. "My controls came on and I started the engine and everything looks OK but the engine won't respond". Didn't matter if it was a QSB or a C32 Cat. Controls power up but during that brief crank time voltage dropped below 10.2 volts and the control went into self protect. New batteries or cleaning the connections would fix it.
 

CCtuna

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Some day...
A bad ground on the engine for the Scania, caused it to shut down. Unknown issues on the Cummins. I was using a SMX gauge and harness, one day the key switch just wouldn't turn the ECM on the engine on, no power to anything. I troubleshot all of the pins and connectors as best I could, had 12v power to the key switch, but couldn't get he ECM to power up. I ended up sending the harness back to Seaboard, they turned around and sent it back to me saying "nothing was wrong" with it, but everything worked fine when I got it back. Gotta love that voodoo magic!
Lol the ol’ turn it off then back on a few times trick. Unbelievable how often that works. Occum’s razor....
 

c1steve

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I've owned five, yes five, 6BTA 370s.
I have one in the 25 T Jason.
And now I own a QSB 5.9 Recon 480 that is in the 27 H&H that I have not run yet.
Both a very good motors.
The QSB is a bit quieter and just a bit less smokey than the 6BTA
No issue I see owning either other than the $$ savings buying a Tier I recon vs the Tier II electronic lineup.
Only issue with the QSB 5.9 is that the high pressure fuel pump is electric. The QSB 6.7 uses a mechanically driven HP fuel pump, which I am sure is more reliable.
 

Genius

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Only issue with the QSB 5.9 is that the high pressure fuel pump is electric. The QSB 6.7 uses a mechanically driven HP fuel pump, which I am sure is more reliable.
Really, didn't know that. thx
 

leaky

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Only issue with the QSB 5.9 is that the high pressure fuel pump is electric. The QSB 6.7 uses a mechanically driven HP fuel pump, which I am sure is more reliable.

Do those electric fuel pumps help as far as priming?
 

BillD

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Really, didn't know that. thx
Do those electric fuel pumps help as far as priming?
Really, didn't know that. thx

Yes the electronic fuel injection pump/system was changed from the QSB 5.9 to the newest QSB 6.7
The early QSB 5.9's had an electric fuel pump that had early failure issues.
Cummins corrected the pump issues.
Not an issue with the newer CPL QSB 5.9's.
Remember....there are 1000s and 1000s of QSB 5.9s plying the waters in pleasure and commercial applications.
 

WoundUpMarine

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