"Modern Interpretation of the Downeast boat"

MouseTrap

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Cutwater Boats claim to be a a "modern interpretation of the downeast design". Saw a 28' at the Boston Boat show earlier this year.

I'm sure most of the hard core fisherman here will be turned off by this boat, but it was really appealing to my family. The one thing I did like about the 28', is that it had a decent sized cockpit. A lot of today's "family cruisers" are all cabin, with very little outside space. They seam to make a very efficient use of space, they packed a lot of boat into a legally trailer-able pocket cruiser.

Anyway, I like the boat better that a lot of the bleach bottles people are buying today. It has a full keel and protected single flush deck diesel. It only draws 28" of water.

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MouseTrap

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is it me or does it have a step ?

It's not you.

From a review: The boat's bottom is an interesting adaptation of several design elements from totally different types of boats, melded into a new hull the likes of which is quite unusual.

#1. The bottom is a stepped hull, something you might expect to see in a high-speed sportboat or on an offshore race boat hull where an extra knot might mean something. The builder says it's worth 1 to 1-1/2 knots at WOT and that it helps the boat get up on plane faster. We're told that the air sucked under the hull is directed out to the sides so it won't interfere with the single prop.

#2. The keel has a "pad" running its entire length. A pad is not something you generally see on a keel so far forward. Usually they are in the aft 1/3rd of a boat on the center line. Pads are a flat surface that definitely improve speed and fuel efficiency when used in the conventional manner and have been used successfully on everything from bass boats to offshore big game convertibles.

#3. A substantial skeg keel starts about two-thirds of the way back from the bow and runs until the prop shaft protrudes from it. This deep keel protects the prop from grounding, adds directional stability and dampens roll. Keels of this type are typically seen on large displacement cruising boats and trawlers.

#4. Along either side of the keel is a "rounded shoulder", as Cutwater calls it. This is a clever break from convention which is essentially a large bump in the bottom of the hull to allow the engine to be placed lower and the floor of the boat to also be lower. By being placed so low the engine drive shaft can have a down angle of only 6-degrees, which makes the prop almost as efficient as it would be on the horizontal. Typically on inboard powerboats down angles of shafts are from 11 to 14 degrees these days, and they used to be more. Lowering the floor allows Cutwater to have over 6'2" (1.89 m) headroom in the cabin. A tertiary advantage of that bottom bulge is that it slightly reduces the draft of the boat, which is just 26" (66.04 cm).

#5. The raked stem of the bow curves downward into a "near-vertical forefoot." Cutwater says, "This nuance also extends the waterline to improve fuel efficiency and allows fuller sections...[in the bow allowing ]...greater usable interior space."
 

BillD

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It's not you.

From a review: The boat's bottom is an interesting adaptation of several design elements from totally different types of boats, melded into a new hull the likes of which is quite unusual.

#1. The bottom is a stepped hull, something you might expect to see in a high-speed sportboat or on an offshore race boat hull where an extra knot might mean something. The builder says it's worth 1 to 1-1/2 knots at WOT and that it helps the boat get up on plane faster. We're told that the air sucked under the hull is directed out to the sides so it won't interfere with the single prop.

#2. The keel has a "pad" running its entire length. A pad is not something you generally see on a keel so far forward. Usually they are in the aft 1/3rd of a boat on the center line. Pads are a flat surface that definitely improve speed and fuel efficiency when used in the conventional manner and have been used successfully on everything from bass boats to offshore big game convertibles.

#3. A substantial skeg keel starts about two-thirds of the way back from the bow and runs until the prop shaft protrudes from it. This deep keel protects the prop from grounding, adds directional stability and dampens roll. Keels of this type are typically seen on large displacement cruising boats and trawlers.

#4. Along either side of the keel is a "rounded shoulder", as Cutwater calls it. This is a clever break from convention which is essentially a large bump in the bottom of the hull to allow the engine to be placed lower and the floor of the boat to also be lower. By being placed so low the engine drive shaft can have a down angle of only 6-degrees, which makes the prop almost as efficient as it would be on the horizontal. Typically on inboard powerboats down angles of shafts are from 11 to 14 degrees these days, and they used to be more. Lowering the floor allows Cutwater to have over 6'2" (1.89 m) headroom in the cabin. A tertiary advantage of that bottom bulge is that it slightly reduces the draft of the boat, which is just 26" (66.04 cm).

#5. The raked stem of the bow curves downward into a "near-vertical forefoot." Cutwater says, "This nuance also extends the waterline to improve fuel efficiency and allows fuller sections...[in the bow allowing ]...greater usable interior space."

It's not for me !
 

jerseysportfisher

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Looks really busy

HullFeatures.png



normally a step doesn't add a signifcant decrease in drag untill your passed 25 knots, what is even more perplexing is the designer adds a step to reduce drag, yet ads signifiganlty more wetted surface to the boat with the so called keel pad. I would also presume at higher speeds that protruding skarkfin adds more turbulance towards the wheel. Rather then having smooth hydrodynamic features to reduce turbulance lets just add them every where.
 

MouseTrap

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I have no idea how it does in the slop. Here is a review of the performance in an article:

The main engine, a Yanmar 6BY2, 260 hp, started easily without even a wisp of smoke. This 183-cubic-inch, 694-pound, common-rail engine ran smoothly and quietly on startup and performed well during our test.

We idled away from the dock at 670 rpm making 3.9 knots and burning 0.3 gallons of diesel per hour. The ability of a vessel to proceed at a relatively slow speed with precise control in crowded marinas is very important, and the Cutwaters, complete with bow and stern thrusters, will perform that job very well.

At 1000 rpm, we made 5.4 knots and sipped 0.6 gph. Even with the aft door open, the noise level was only 67 decibels. At 2000 rpm, we burned 3 gph and made 9 knots. At 3000 rpm, we made 18.6 knots and burned 6.6 gph, while 3500 rpm brought 23.1 knots with a fuel burn of 10.6 gph. WOT, about 4080 rpm, had us scooting along at 28.2 knots and burning 13.4 gph. All speeds were measured by GPS, and fuel-consumption figures were generated by the engine's onboard computer.

The vessel tracked well and responded smartly and precisely to the helm at all speeds. We laid beam on close to a passing ferry wake, and the vessel handled that very well. We then pounded through the wake at speed, and the 28-footer had no problem. In tight turns, the vessel stuck well without skidding or skipping. At all speeds and under all our test conditions, the vessel exhibited no bad habits.

While this is a good vessel, there are a couple of improvements that could easily be made. More handrails inside would be welcome, and many cruisers would like more fuel capacity ' 100 gallons is too limiting for such a good cruising boat.


Sea - America's Western Boating Magazine
 

Powderpro

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Mouse Trap- I have seen a number of these boats up close in Bellingham, WA. Never been on one, but I have looked at them in the water and looked at them sitting on the trailer. It definitely isn't the tried and true downeast boat with round chines, big keel, etc- I'm actually not quite sure why they would call it or market it as a downeast style boat. It really doesn't remind me of a downeast boat. But none the less, I think it's a cool boat if you are looking in the 26'-28' range. They seem a little smaller to me than say a 28' Albin. The tunnel where the prop is located is a great design in my opinion. Like the article says, it allows for shallower draft and a much flatter shaft angle (both are things I like). If you are a hard-core downeast lobster boat or nothing kind of a guy, then this isn't the boat for you. I think this boat would make a great little cruiser for a family that wants comfort, trailerability, fuel efficiency, and an inboard diesel in a modern styled package.
 

F/V First Team

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The 28':
Special pricing from $169,937.

Options, freight & taxes extra

The 26':
Special pricing from $139,937.

Options, freight & taxes extra

I wouldn't be all that excited in the "private birth compartment" personally. Clever, but not for me. Might be a good place to stow stuff, but that's about it.
 

jerseysportfisher

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i think if i had the loot for a NEW production boat and was looking to fill a DE style, i think i would lean more toward the pearson true north.
 

MouseTrap

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...It definitely isn't the tried and true downeast boat with round chines, big keel, etc- I'm actually not quite sure why they would call it or market it as a downeast style boat...I think this boat would make a great little cruiser for a family that wants comfort, trailerability, fuel efficiency, and an inboard diesel in a modern styled package.

Marketing: I think you hit the nail on the head. It's all marketing. I think you also summed up nicely why this boat was appealing to my other half.

...I wouldn't be all that excited in the "private birth compartment" personally. Clever, but not for me. Might be a good place to stow stuff, but that's about it.

You should have seen my 5 and 7 year old when they discovered the hidden birth under the dinette! I wouldn't want to sleep in that coffin, but they thought it was the best fort $169,000 could buy :D.

Good comments, I don't think I see a Cutwater in my future. The interior kind of reminds me of a motor home. Not saying that its good or bad, just that I've never been a motor home kind of guy. Our current boat is very spartan, and utilitarian, and has served us well. Sometimes less is more!
 
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