New heat shrink connectors

Discussion in 'Marine Electrical / Electronics' started by Bill, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. Bill

    Bill Administrator

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    Has anyone tried these ? The middle solders the 2 ends together when it’s heated. And the price is right ..

    210pcs Heat Shrink Connectors, Sopoby Solder Seal Wire Connectors & Heat Shrink Butt Crimp Connectors Electrical Connectors Waterproof Assorted Wire Terminal Kit, 26-10GA https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01H8WAYSK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_EYVaDb4PQ82TF


     
    Bill,
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  2. Keelboater

    Keelboater Captain

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    Looks like a good idea. I'll have to try them out. Thanks for posting this.
     
  3. WoundUpMarine

    WoundUpMarine Captain

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    Agreed, looks pretty good, for the price I'll buy a set and use them when I rewire the duffy, see how they really work
     
  4. Bill

    Bill Administrator

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  5. backman

    backman Captain

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    What provides strain relief without the crimp?
     
  6. Genius

    Genius Captain

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    I think the solder joint? I hate to be the devils advocate, but I think these things would be a PIA to use. I'll stick to ancor crimp connectors.
     
  7. winterking

    winterking Captain

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    They are a pain to use, if you don’t have everything perfect or if you’re in a tight spot they can drive you crazy. But when they work they’re pretty slick. I ended up going back to crimped connectors and heat shrink tubing.
     
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  8. backman

    backman Captain

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    I could see those being great in some applications, especially a 3’ unstrained #22 to #22 electronics connection.


    I would hate to be dependent on the solder and shrink for strain relief a 20’ run of #10 wire through a tight conduit and into the bilge.

    While on the tight spot - serious question - anyone come up for a good crimp tool for aging bodied and eyes while contorted and hanging sideways. I have at least 3 different crimping tools from cheap hardware one to a decent ratchet one and find myself invariably trying each of them as I struggle to get things lined up, my eyes on the target and the crimper jaws onto the right location on the connector!
     
  9. Old Mud

    Old Mud Captain

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    Ah Cappy, i have had the same problem for a few years now. I to would also like a good crimping tool. Let us know if/when you find one. As for the eyes, im having mine done in Sept. hoping that will help me.
     
  10. Keelboater

    Keelboater Captain

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    Have 'em put some cross hairs on those eyes while he's at it! ;)
     
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  11. Old Mud

    Old Mud Captain

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    Excellent idea !! I could still us the scope i broke. :)
     
  12. captjohn

    captjohn Captain

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    These were not designed, or intended, for the purpose shown.

    They were designed specifically to connect a small gauge wire to the outer shield on a coaxial wire. Connections like this are used to prevent external electrical noise from getting onto the inner wire, which involves minimal current. Low temperature solder is used so as to avoid melting the insulation between the shield wire and the center conductor, during heating. And small gauge wires transmit a minimal amount of vibration into the solder joint. We used them all the time on aircraft wiring for this purpose, within the back shell of connectors, to further minimize vibration of the wire. The manufacturers designed them for this application only. Having spent a lot of time troubleshooting wiring, I can tell you that these can be very unforgiving, even for their intended application.

    The problem with these splices is the low temperature solder used. Low temperature solder alloys are VERY weak. The solder cracks, and separates, very easily during any flexing of the wire during vibration, resulting in increased resistance (voltage drop) across the connection. They also have a minimal amount of solder flux in every splice, too little for heavier gauge wires, especially old wiring. Use of these splices on heavier gauge wires would be a "worst case" application.

    I would highly recommend against using these for anything but their original intended application.
     
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  13. Keelboater

    Keelboater Captain

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    I was curious about any flux, and the type of solder. Thanks for pointing this out.
     
  14. Amaralfish

    Amaralfish Member

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    I wouldn’t use them
    Crimping has a better connection
    Solder is good until it gets hot and the solder wicks away
    Some guys tried them on west coast failed over time
     
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  15. Bill

    Bill Administrator

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    Good discussion glad I asked !
     
    Bill,
  16. fortier256

    fortier256 Captain

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    I use that type of connection regularly. You crimp and then heat. You have the strength of the crimp, the connection that the solder provides, and the sealant that the heat shrink provides. I get them from Del City.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2019
  17. captjohn

    captjohn Captain

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    The type of connector being discussed is NOT a crimp type, the connection is via solder, which is reflowed by means of a heat gun, or any other heat source.

    In any connection you want what is referred to as a "gas tight seal". In a solder connection, air is kept away from the wires, or contacts, by conductive solder. In a crimp, if done properly, air is kept away from the wires, or contacts, by mechanical means, the metals are squeezed together so tight that air can not get to the contact area. Crimp connections have an advantage over solder connections in that their is not only an electrical connection made, but also a mechanical connection. Solder also makes a mechanical connection, but a much weaker one. The glue in heat shrink connections does provide a mechanical connection as well as an environmental seal. For marine applications, crimp and heat seal connections really are the way to go.
     
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  18. steveinak

    steveinak Captain

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    You surfaced ! All good ?
     
  19. Amaralfish

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    Been hectic. Wife spent the night in the hospital last night. Baby is doing good
     
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  20. restless

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    A cold soldered joint is going to give you trouble for sure. I would much prefer a quality crimp.
     

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