?? on balance line between twin fuel tanks ??

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power
Hello ALL,

is there a USCG regulation or prohibition on installing a "fuel balance line" in a boat with twin fuel tanks?

I've heard "yes" and I heard "no".

The yes and the no could be on a USCG "inspected" passenger vessel or "other".

What's the scoop?

On my "virtual DE build" the particular hull my require twin fuel tanks.
I like simplicity and would want to install a 3/4" or 1" balance line with shutoff valves @ the aft bottom of the tanks.

Any knowledge on this out there??

btw, my build would be non-commercial/non-6 pack charter but obviously on a resale don't want anything installed on the boat to impede a sale.

Appreciated, Bill D
 

Badlatitude

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I would rather valve two tanks properly for bolth feed and return than put a balance line between the two tanks. Reason being you can ballast manually to make up for load on the boat. IE send your returned fuel to a tank other than the one it came from or just run them all open and feed off bolth while returning to bolth etc.

If one leaks you can run it down and isolate it in an emergency also
 

captainlarry84

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KristenFormer Charter Captain
The beauty of twin tanks is if one fails you are still in business. If you get bad fuel it can be contained to one tank. Keeping a boat trim with twin tanks is a walk in the part. On my flow scan every 40 gallons I switch tanks. keeping the boat in trim at all times.
 

Jon Boat

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no, at least for sub-chapter t vessels (under 100 tons) . the cfr's are very clear on what is acceptable & what it not when it comes to fuel tank construction, fuel line requirements, etc. when diesel powered. i deal with this many times per year and are current with the latest regs.

are you building a boat that requires a particular uscg certification? recreational use boats (non-uscg inspected vessels) are even more lenient on this when you are speaking diesel #2, but gas is a movie. if recreational, basically you have very little to deal with as to the uscg other the pfds, and other basic personal safety things. boat construction is very open except when dealing with gas.



jon
 
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