Perkins t6354 compession

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
Does anyone know what the PSI range should be on a 220 hp perkins T6354?
Cant seem to find it it my manual ro anywhere else.
Thanks
Rich


Also has anyone purchased an engine from seamaster marine?
Unautherized cummins dealer but good prices.
seamastermarine.com
 
Last edited:

Brooksie

Rear Admiral
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Posts
1,834
Likes
983
Location
Cape Cod
Boat Make
Bruno-Stillman 35
I looked in my Perkins shop manuals and there is no ideal compression pressure listed. This would only be a guess based on other diesels 250-350 psi.. If you are troubleshooting a problem, look for differences between cylinders over specific pressures and the squirt of oil to isolate ring from valve problems. Harbor Freit has a tester for $60. with the proper CAV adapter for the Perko

http://www.atlanticmobilemarine.com/63544%20shop%20manual.pdf
 
Last edited:

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
Thanks Brooksie
Just needed a base line.
Bought a better model tester from tool discounter.
100 bucks delivered.
Getting a lot of unburnt fuel out of the exhaust, hope it's an injector leaking.
Otherwise the engine runs like a sewing machine!
Thanks again
Rich
 

Brooksie

Rear Admiral
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Posts
1,834
Likes
983
Location
Cape Cod
Boat Make
Bruno-Stillman 35
I send all "5 pcs. diesel equipment" to Blue Ridge Injector Service in VA. Very honest, fair, reasonable. I don't trust the 2 places in Boston near me, they always seem always to say "new nozzles, new nozzles"
 
Last edited:

djmarchand

Captain
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Posts
664
Likes
290
Location
Litchfield, CT / Punta Gorda, Fl
Boat Make
Atlas Pompano 23 outboard
Doing a compression test on a diesel "as a baseline" just doesn't make sense. Diesels unlike gassers, just don't slowly loose compression over their lifetime. I think it is because diesel fuel is viscous enough to seal even worn rings. That is probably why Perkins doesn't publish compression numbers.

But blowby does increase over time as rings and valve guides wear. Invest in blowby testing gear- typically an orfice and manometer, and monitor blowby as an indication of how your diesel is doing. Some diesel engine manufacturers do publish blowby testing procedures and wear limits. But if your engine is healthy now, do a blowby test and determine a baseline.

David
 

Eslang

Commander
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Posts
394
Likes
124
Location
Shelter Island, NY
Boat Make
43 Flowers
Seamaster Marine

Does anyone know what the PSI range should be on a 220 hp perkins T6354?
Cant seem to find it it my manual ro anywhere else.
Thanks
Rich


Also has anyone purchased an engine from seamaster marine?
Unautherized cummins dealer but good prices.
seamastermarine.com

Ron is a good, standup, guy. He has always been good to me.
 

Brooksie

Rear Admiral
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Posts
1,834
Likes
983
Location
Cape Cod
Boat Make
Bruno-Stillman 35
Doing a compression test on a diesel "as a baseline" just doesn't make sense. Diesels unlike gassers, just don't slowly loose compression over their lifetime. I think it is because diesel fuel is viscous enough to seal even worn rings. That is probably why Perkins doesn't publish compression numbers.

But blowby does increase over time as rings and valve guides wear. Invest in blowby testing gear- typically an orfice and manometer, and monitor blowby as an indication of how your diesel is doing. Some diesel engine manufacturers do publish blowby testing procedures and wear limits. But if your engine is healthy now, do a blowby test and determine a baseline.

David

You are right, I guess that's why and pressures I have seen published have a wide range, over 100 psi. for diesels. But still, a compression test, looking for differences between cylinders, as I mentioned above, could help isolate a problem with a single cylinder or adjacent pair such as a burnt valve or seat, crack in the head, or blown head gasket.
Are you refering to a leakdown tester? Or is there also a blowby tester?
 

djmarchand

Captain
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Posts
664
Likes
290
Location
Litchfield, CT / Punta Gorda, Fl
Boat Make
Atlas Pompano 23 outboard
Brooksie:

Yes, once you have determined that one or more cylinders aren't firing (usually by cracking the injector pipe) then a compression test can confirm that it is due to bad rings. That is the main value of a compression test. Theoretically at least a non firing cylinder could be due to that cylinder's injection plunger not working.

A leakdown test is something different. I think you pressurize the cylinder with air and time how long it takes for the pressure to drop. It is obviously a static test.

A blowby test is dynamic. A simple, gross way to tell that you have significant blowby is while cruising at normal loads, feel the blowby tube if it is easily available or maybe take off the oil filler cap. With significant blowby you will feel pulses of exhaust. On my Yanmar 6LY the blowby tube stops right above the air filter element so it is real easy to check. I can't really feel anything- which is good.

A quantitative test is engine specific. Cummins publishes a test procedure for 6Bs and if you want a copy, PM me and I will send it.

To do the test, you disconnect the Cummins blowby tube (I am not a Cummins guy, so I am speaking from rote) and insert a calibrated orifice. Then with a manometer you measure the pressure in the crankcase just before the orifice. The more pressure, then the more blowby.

I am not a diesel mechanic, but I have done all of my own maintenance on my current Yanmar and previous diesels and have followed boatdiesel and have learned something about these things. I do know that my neighbor's 25 year old crapped out VW diesel Rabbit will almost blow my hand up when I put it over the oil filler cap and I can barely feel anything from my Yanmar's blowby tube. So I know it works and have some idea of what both ends of the spectrum feel like.

David
 

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
Thanks for all the responses fellas.
I'm used to gas engines. Just wanted to know average compression #s.
Going to use standard diagnosis procedures to diagnose my issue.
I'll post my findings when as I go down the road.
Thanks again
Rich
 

Brooksie

Rear Admiral
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Posts
1,834
Likes
983
Location
Cape Cod
Boat Make
Bruno-Stillman 35
Brooksie:

Yes, once you have determined that one or more cylinders aren't firing (usually by cracking the injector pipe) then a compression test can confirm that it is due to bad rings. That is the main value of a compression test. Theoretically at least a non firing cylinder could be due to that cylinder's injection plunger not working.

A leakdown test is something different. I think you pressurize the cylinder with air and time how long it takes for the pressure to drop. It is obviously a static test.

A blowby test is dynamic. A simple, gross way to tell that you have significant blowby is while cruising at normal loads, feel the blowby tube if it is easily available or maybe take off the oil filler cap. With significant blowby you will feel pulses of exhaust. On my Yanmar 6LY the blowby tube stops right above the air filter element so it is real easy to check. I can't really feel anything- which is good.

A quantitative test is engine specific. Cummins publishes a test procedure for 6Bs and if you want a copy, PM me and I will send it.

To do the test, you disconnect the Cummins blowby tube (I am not a Cummins guy, so I am speaking from rote) and insert a calibrated orifice. Then with a manometer you measure the pressure in the crankcase just before the orifice. The more pressure, then the more blowby.

I am not a diesel mechanic, but I have done all of my own maintenance on my current Yanmar and previous diesels and have followed boatdiesel and have learned something about these things. I do know that my neighbor's 25 year old crapped out VW diesel Rabbit will almost blow my hand up when I put it over the oil filler cap and I can barely feel anything from my Yanmar's blowby tube. So I know it works and have some idea of what both ends of the spectrum feel like.

David

Yes, leakdown tester I have used but blowby, not.
Speaking of blowby, my engine has an old, remote mount. Airsep that passes the blowby through a large canister of bronze wool b/4 it goes into the turbo intake. The "bucket" on this Airsep collects a liquid condensate. I think most of the newer Airseps run this liquid back into the crancase... Anyway this liquid which looks like amber paint thinner, is some rude stuff and will burn the hands. Acid, alkaline, I don't know. My old engine produces about 3/4 cup of this stuff in 200hrs.
 

jconnell

Ensign
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Posts
12
Likes
4
I have the same motors in a henriques maine coaster and one has the same problem to the point I can rotate it by hand. Possibly related, when I ran the boat a couple hundred miles one way the oil level got low and the motor ended up running away and I had to take a towel and shut air off to the turbo. As a result I'm looking at either repowering, or they sell rebuild kits with liners and rings...has everyone ever rebuilt one of these?
 

gary49

Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 25, 2013
Posts
53
Likes
14
Location
free union, va
Boat Make
34' Mainship I
The Perkins is designed to be rebuildable, as you note, it is a linered engine, you theoretically could run one forever. We have one that we resurrected, had been given up for scrap, as it was flooded in hurricane Isabel, sitting in the PO's garage. Full of water for 8 years, and we took the engine with the boat, as it had usable parts on it. I tasted the water in the crankcase when we drained it out, and it was essentially fresh, not salty (rain water floats on stormsurge water). Anyway, to make a long story short, all it took was a polish job on the crank journals, new bearings, a gasket set, and she runs. Liners and rings didn't have water or damage, head was perfect, the engine was rebuilt before it was flooded. They're not hard to work on, but the parts are pricey and sometimes almost impossible to get. Both the rebuilt engine and the one in the boat are counter rotaters, and try finding a new water pump for one. Some of the higher hp ones have a so-called Mani-cooler that is out of sight expensive. What we have are 160 hp, turboed and aftercooled, not too exotic. Plan to change the rebuilt one into the boat this winter, the engine in the boat is extremely leaky, probably could fix it, but want to clean and paint the bilge so it needs to come out, even though it runs just fine. Nice reliable engines, not speed demons, but relatively quiet, run a long time, don't use much fuel, we like 'em.
 

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
Perkins recap;
Did valve adjustment some were out of spec.
Did a cyl firing test, all cyl firing
Engine runs good , started right up @ 24*
Going to pull injectors and do compression test.
If all is within 10% of each other I'm calling it good.
Then send the injectors for testing.
Manometer isn't goin to happen this season.
Leak down? , we'll see what the comp. is.
PARTS-
I have had good service from trans Atlantic diesel.
I needed a water pump standard rotation engine(cc)
no problem, lift pump, thermostats,heat exchanger O rings.
There are some other sites on the net for rebuild kits.
Not too hard to find.
 

djmarchand

Captain
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Posts
664
Likes
290
Location
Litchfield, CT / Punta Gorda, Fl
Boat Make
Atlas Pompano 23 outboard
That the engine starts easily from 24 deg is a pretty good indication that the rings, guides, injectors, injector pump and timing are all good. I realize that this isn't consistent with a fuel sheen on the water that you reported earlier, particularly the health of the injectors. So maybe pop testing the injectors will tell you something.

David
 

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
The fuel sheen;
Two Seasons ago I would see a drip worth while idling drifthn for fluke .
This season it really started showing.
At the end of the season I had her idling, put a scewdriver on each injector.
Three injectors were a lot louder than the Others.
I'm not sure this means anything ,but in my mind they should sound the same.
Don't know if this is a way to diagnose injectors.
 

Artemis

Lieutenant
Joined
Jan 23, 2013
Posts
51
Likes
9
Location
United Kingdom
Boat Make
1960's powerboat
That the engine starts easily from 24 deg is a pretty good indication that the rings, guides, injectors, injector pump and timing are all good. I realize that this isn't consistent with a fuel sheen on the water that you reported earlier, particularly the health of the injectors. So maybe pop testing the injectors will tell you something.

David

You have got it...............Amazing how many folks including surveyors have not.

Reason that Perkins did not publish compression #'s for OP's Dot 4 Perkins 6.354 is that compression testing was not recognised as a valid troubleshooting procedure for diesel engines.

I have experienced leaking injector sleeves on Volvo's, white smoke on Cummins due to incorrect copper washers...All down to engine surveyors in U.S being gasoline girls.
 

Capt Rich

Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Posts
77
Likes
7
Location
Long Island N.Y.
Manual reads :
Service injectors @ 2400 hrs
Still I think it's good to know compression readings for general knowledge of your engine.
 
Top Bottom