Price of diesel?

goody

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fuel

it's 4.09 for val tec in one marina 4.00 for luke oil in the other marina in forked river n.j.
 

petrel

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$3.95 in Hatteras. We always get screwed by the local cartel.
 

Blitzen

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Fifteen years ago it was 65 cents, now its to fuckin much. How is it that something less refined (diesel) is more than something more refined (gas)? I will tell you how...............we are getting fucked that's how!
Mike I agree with you it is too much but it is certaily more refined than it was 15 years ago. ULS diesel was not mandated by the EPA then and is now required.
Most of the world has embraced diesel cars and trucks hence demand for diesel for cars has gone way up, unlike here in the US where diesel cars are just starting to become popular. Everyday more and more trucks that run on gas are being phased over to new diesel trucks. Demand just keeps rising.
Then there is the cost of getting the crude out of the earth, the easy stuff has been produced and the remaining oil is more difficult and expensive to extract.
Not that this helps with the price any but it does help me understand why it is costing us more. Everyone would benefit from lower fuel prices and out economy would be humming along like a well oiled machine.
 

petrel

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Good points but worldwide demand rises and oil companies make record profits as a result, despite the difficulty of extraction and requirements for cleaner fuels. They've got it and we need it, just like these three families down here who have been fucking the fishermen for decades. They are going to get their's first.
 

plowin

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John I am not looking to argue but we hear how the cost of getting it out of the ground has risen and how the demand has risen but if that's the case why are oil company profits far higher than they have ever been. Its not an easy thing to accept but I believe the fact of the matter is that we are getting fucked even if its just a little. Oh, two more things. First, have you ever seen a broke Arab? Two gasoline is still far more refined than diesel, how do we explain/justify that? Bend over here it comes, that's how!
 

MBILL

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$4.50 in Freeport N.Y. You southern boys have it good!
The EPA and the environmental wackos have teamed up to make oil production and prices as painful as possible. They live in a dream world...
 

tomy

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Hi all. I have to watch the price every day...4 yr ago the oil minister of saudie arabia was defending the "crude" oil increase from $35.00 to $50.00 per barrell saying that SAUDIA ARABIA would be very happy with 35 per barrel. That statement I saw was on a national news media TV station.(Don't remebember which) Anyway, after seeing & hearing that, HE was never heard from again! (I mean on TV) The Democrates have continued to lower the value of the US Dollar. They do that to pay China off. The NGO's are out of control.There in lies the bottom line. Our Gov. is the culpret. not the oil companies. (Try to get a drilling permit in US. Why did HESS shut down thier refinery in NY / NJ ?) We keep paying and paying.:evil:

Oh yea..paid 4.09 yesterday in Winthrop MA yesterday. 5/5/13
 

RyanCT

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I was in Doha (Qatar) last month and converting riyal per liter to dollars per gallon worked out to be less than 50 cents per gallon..... At the pump. Costs to get it havent increased that much.......
 

Dr Dude

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plowin

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A year ago the Saudi prince that was interviewed in regards to the oil prices said that the Saudis would be quite content with 100.00 per barrel oil. In his words "we could make money and the U.S. economy would be fine. The devalued US dollar makes for a great excuse but I am not buying it. We will see eventually, the US dollar will in all likelihood not be in the tank forever and then fuel will be less expensive. They have us use to these prices, its only going to go up from here .

Lets see prior to Obama gas was 1.98 and everybody blamed Bush for being in bed with big oil, now it is almost double that. The bulk of the country has their head firmly implanted in their own asses, they put the guy in for four more years.

Plowin is out on this one, it just pisses me off.
 

petrel

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Not defending Obama, but the most I ever paid for diesel was summer 2008 and I though George Bush was President. Seem to recall it had been steadily going up for some years along w/ housing, which was another greed driven debacle that out our country on the road to ruin. Of course gas prices went way down late that fall, but diesel did not fall off as much.
 

BillD

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Fwiw

Is this light at the end of the tunnel?? Probably NO !!:confused:

U.S. Oil Boom Scrambles Mideast Calculus

As Syria's war worsens and calls for U.S. involvement persist, another development looms: government projections show the U.S. will produce more oil than it imports. The two are not unrelated, says Jerry Seib on the News Hub. Photo: Associated Press.

Syria's civil war increasingly threatens to metastasize into a regional conflict, as Hezbollah fighters join the battle on the side of Syria's government, prompting the Syrian opposition to return fire directly into Hezbollah's home base in Lebanon. Calls for the U.S. to get involved persist.

Meanwhile, another interesting news development looms. Government projections show that in September, for the first time in almost two decades, the U.S. will produce more oil than it imports. Nor will that be a fluke; the trend is expected to continue, and domestic oil production is expected to outstrip imports by an increasingly wide margin throughout 2014.

These two developments may seem unrelated, but they are not. The worsening situation in Syria raises the question of whether the U.S. will feel compelled to do something militarily to help end the rule of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad. At the same time, though, declining U.S. reliance on Middle Eastern oil raises the question of whether Americans will find it ever harder to see the point of getting involved in that messy region.

Syria itself is an exceedingly marginal oil producer, so its direct role in the energy picture isn't an issue in calculating America's interests there.

But for four decades, a broader calculus has been at work: Americans' crying need for Arab oil meant it had to be constantly involved in the quest for stability and influence throughout the Middle East. The U.S. thirst for imported oil meant it needed allies and influence in the region, whether that meant billions of dollars in aid to friendly Arab countries, or a constant search to broker a deal for the Palestinian independence that Arabs demanded, or a military presence somewhere, anywhere.


Reuters
Domestic oil production int he U.S. is expected to outstrip imports throughout 2014. Above, an exploratory well drills for oil in the Monterey Shale, Calif.

It would be shorted-sighted in the extreme to think these imperatives are simply vanishing because of a shift in oil production. The dream of complete American energy independence remains "illusory for the time being," notes Aaron David Miller, a former U.S. Middle East negotiator in Republican and Democratic administrations who now is a vice president at the Wilson Center.

More importantly, Mr. Miller adds that "we'll always have a vital interest in energy security. That is to say, given that oil is sold, or not, in one [global] market, we still have a stake in ensuring no disruption, and that our allies in Europe and Japan have access, and that no hostile power controls this resource."

Beyond that, of course, the U.S. has a profound interest in ensuring that failed states in the region don't become incubators of Islamic terrorism, and in preventing a globe-rattling surge of nuclear proliferation that could be set off if Iran produces a nuclear weapon.

Seib & Wessel

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In short, bugging out of the region's problems shouldn't be considered an option. Still, there's no disputing that engagement is going to be a tougher sell, one requiring domestic as much as international leadership out of Washington.

Americans already are feeling war weariness because of the decadelong military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. There seems little doubt that the march closer to energy independence—brought on by the oil fracking revolution and the related discovery of giant and reachable domestic natural-gas reserves—has only begun to affect the American psyche.

That's true because the magnitude of the change is only starting to sink in. As oil analyst Daniel Yergin has pointed out, U.S. oil production is up 43% since 2008—a daily increase that is nearly equal to all of Nigeria's oil production.

Is that affecting President Barack Obama's decision-making on Syria? There's no direct evidence of that. Mr. Obama offers other plausible reasons for his reluctance to get involved, principally the fear that even a small American intervention ultimately could require a much larger commitment to ensure Mr. Assad's departure—and that once the U.S. is involved in breaking down Syria, it will assume principal responsibility for the arduous task of putting the pieces back together again.

Enlarge Image

Still, Middle Eastern leaders, never noteworthy for their broad vision or foresight, would be wise to take note of the way the political landscape could change as the energy component of that landscape is altered. They can no longer assume that Washington can be easily lured, or simply blackmailed, into helping fix the region's messes. For decades, dependence on foreign energy went a long way toward holding at bay the American public's traditional isolationist tendencies; there's no guarantee that will continue.

At the same time, America's leaders assume some new obligations of their own. They will need to better explain why the U.S. can't afford to simply exit the region's affairs. "We need the oil" won't be a sufficient rationale any longer. But there are other, less obvious reasons—principally terrorism, nuclear proliferation and the overall health of the oil-fueled global economy—for America to remain engaged.

Write to Gerald F. Seib at [email protected]

A version of this article appeared June 4, 2013, on page A4 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Oil Boom Scrambles Mideast Calculus.
 
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