Question about best dinghy for a new boat

CaseyMarie

Commander
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Nov 29, 2011
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Hingham, MA
First Name
Stu
Boat Make
Blue Seas, Boston Whaler
Quick points on Hypalon vs PVC inflatables; first of all, understand that an inflatable boat is a disposable boat. PVC fabric will break down over time when exposed to UV, but the seams can be welded/thermo-bonded, which means less likely to leak. Hypalon fabric can not be welded/thermobonded, so seams have to be glued. The glue breaks down over time and starts to leak. Both boats will end up in a dumpster eventually.

Most people are quick to recommend Hypalon over PVC because Hypalon lasts longer than PVC. This is true, but Hypalon is on average about twice the money as PVC. Personally I would rather spend half the money twice as often on PVC. In the end you have spent the same amount of money, but you have a new boat twice as often, which is also usually under warranty for the first few years or so.

If you do buy a PVC boat, to combat the UW rays, I recommend keeping it covered when not in use. A PVC boat looks dirty when the fabric is breaking down from UV. There for if you protect it from UV, it will look cleaner/better for much longer.

There's my two cents...
 

islander

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Jan 8, 2012
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Location
Channel Islands Harbor, California
Boat Make
Duffy 35
Hello Everyone,

After much looking and thinking about what boat we wanted, we have decided on getting a Back Cove 41, as we have loved the look of these boats for years. We live in eastern NC (not exactly Maine or lobster country), but we love the water and wanted a boat to do weekends out at Cape Lookout or perhaps do trips in and around the inland coastal waters of NC. And in a few years when I retire, I wanted a boat that we could do the Loop with, if we are up for that adventure and Corona virus had run its course.

We currently have a 21 foot 2012 BW Montauk, which we have bought when we had a place at Atlantic Beach. We kept it down there and it was a great compromise between a skiff and a deep-V hull for the waters around MHC, Beaufort, Harker's Island and the Cape. Now we have moved to Washington, NC and still use the boat on nice days, but wanted something for cooler weather and for weekend trips.

I had been looking at trawlers, but they are just too slow to get anywhere from our home base in Washington, and I am not retired yet so time is an issue. So, we got interested in Back Coves and also looked at Sabres but I was attracted to the simplicity of the single engine of the Back Cove and wasn't sure about the pods for our area.

So, to the point of the post: we will need a dinghy to get to shore if we weekend at the Cape (or anchor out anywhere else and want to go ashore) and I am searching for advice. I have seen the lifts, but they are very expensive. We don't want to take up the entire swim platform, if possible. Anyone with a similar boat that can share their setup and what they like or would do differently given the chance, I would appreciate any advice.

Thanks,
Mark
Hi Mark- I have a 35 Duffy; similar in profile to the Black Cove. I have tried all sorts of dinghies over the years. There are of course trade offs with each one. I have had RIBs and straight up Inflatables.
The last one I had was a AB 9AL. It lasted 9 years of the stern of my boat using Saint Croix Davits. The small gas outboards are fine; but if not used enough can be difficult due the carburetors not liking todays blend of fuel. That said I recently purchased a 12 foot Point Defiance skiff. Being fiberglass and carbon fiber it is light. 135 lbs. I also don't have to worry about a punctured tube or the degradation of the fabric due to UV. I also just looks super good and appeals to the sensibilities Downeast boat owners have. It rows very well and also has a sail rig. I have it powered by a Torqeedo 1103. Runs silent, no gas; no mantenance oil changes etc. I also like it as it comes off the stern in there parts; which helps my back. The Point Defiance goes thru the water very well, the range is about 25 miles on a full charge with 3.8knots. At 4.5 knots the range is about 12nm.
The PD is not as stable as a RIB. I quickly adjusted to that.

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Alisske

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Oct 21, 2020
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Hi Mark- I have a 35 Duffy; similar in profile to the Black Cove. I have tried all sorts of dinghies over the years. There are of course trade offs with each one. I have had RIBs and straight up Inflatables.
The last one I had was a AB 9AL. It lasted 9 years of the stern of my boat using Saint Croix Davits. The small gas outboards are fine; but if not used enough can be difficult due the carburetors not liking todays blend of fuel. That said I recently purchased a 12 foot Point Defiance skiff. Being fiberglass and carbon fiber it is light. 135 lbs. I also don't have to worry about a punctured tube or the degradation of the fabric due to UV. I also just looks super good and appeals to the sensibilities Downeast boat owners have. It rows very well and also has a sail rig. I have it powered by a Torqeedo 1103. Runs silent, no gas; no mantenance oil changes etc. I also like it as it comes off the stern in there parts; which helps my back. The Point Defiance goes thru the water very well, the range is about 25 miles on a full charge with 3.8knots. At 4.5 knots the range is about 12nm.
The PD is not as stable as a RIB. I quickly adjusted to that.

View attachment 137122

View attachment 137123
That port defiance looks great. One thing to add, it thaat hardshells can be rowed. Its nice to hop in for short hauls and just row. The PD looks like it rows well (shape of hull and “kick” at the aft of the boat)

I have always had a hardshell. A 12 sturdee dory is also a nice choice. Its more stable with a flat bottom, but wont row as well. I have a 10 sturdee. Rows nice. Tows great (doing 16knts in pic). Light weight.

Home

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8EDDEFB2-7646-4F64-BC10-2778DCE985A7.jpeg
 

ARC

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great South Bay
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31’ eastern Casco Bay
Check out Takacat. Far better fabric and workmanship then any mid range boats. Also never hold water so the boat is alway dry. 61ADB5CF-57F5-4C83-9DA4-9FDB7932300A.jpeg 7F7137F8-2949-4F4B-95D4-974946E1643F.jpeg
 

islander

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Posts
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Location
Channel Islands Harbor, California
Boat Make
Duffy 35
That port defiance looks great. One thing to add, it thaat hardshells can be rowed. Its nice to hop in for short hauls and just row. The PD looks like it rows well (shape of hull and “kick” at the aft of the boat)

I have always had a hardshell. A 12 sturdee dory is also a nice choice. Its more stable with a flat bottom, but wont row as well. I have a 10 sturdee. Rows nice. Tows great (doing 16knts in pic). Light weight.

Home

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View attachment 137238
I did take a look at the Sturdee. Nice boat. In the end the Point Defiance was easier to get here on the west coast.
 

05bill

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cape cod
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rp, willis beal
Hi Mark- I have a 35 Duffy; similar in profile to the Black Cove. I have tried all sorts of dinghies over the years. There are of course trade offs with each one. I have had RIBs and straight up Inflatables.
The last one I had was a AB 9AL. It lasted 9 years of the stern of my boat using Saint Croix Davits. The small gas outboards are fine; but if not used enough can be difficult due the carburetors not liking todays blend of fuel. That said I recently purchased a 12 foot Point Defiance skiff. Being fiberglass and carbon fiber it is light. 135 lbs. I also don't have to worry about a punctured tube or the degradation of the fabric due to UV. I also just looks super good and appeals to the sensibilities Downeast boat owners have. It rows very well and also has a sail rig. I have it powered by a Torqeedo 1103. Runs silent, no gas; no mantenance oil changes etc. I also like it as it comes off the stern in there parts; which helps my back. The Point Defiance goes thru the water very well, the range is about 25 miles on a full charge with 3.8knots. At 4.5 knots the range is about 12nm.
The PD is not as stable as a RIB. I quickly adjusted to that.

View attachment 137122

View attachment 137123
like to see it on your st croix davits please ?
 

islander

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Joined
Jan 8, 2012
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Location
Channel Islands Harbor, California
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Duffy 35
like to see it on your st croix davits please ?
I am waiting for the boat vendor to ship me a spreader bar. The original dinghy, the AB9AL had a distance between pickup points of 58 inches. The new dinghy the PD has a distance that is different than that. The answer is a spreader bar. Otherwise I will have to move the Davits outboard to align with the pickup points. I may have to do that, as I have been patiently waiting for the spreader bar.
 

andy65

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Feb 11, 2012
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First Name
Andy
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Northern Bay 36
I have a 10’ Portabote on Martek davits on a Northern Bay 36. Very pleased. The dinghy doesn’t obstruct the view when sitting in the aft deck - important to me. The davits are offset so a portion of the platform is available. Portabote is so light I can raise it with one hand. Silly thing planes on 3.5 hp. Martek was a pleasure to work with. A2AB79E0-0162-4B44-8AA4-3246982EE93B.jpeg
 


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