Raising Deck on Skiff

Discussion in 'Skiffs and Small Work Boats' started by Bassin, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    Anyone ever raise a deck? I'm thinking about lifting the deck on my Maritime Skiff roughly 2 inches. I have a couple ideas for this and I was just wondering if anyone has done this to their skiff.

    My first idea was to raise the stringers by using 2x4's and glassing over them. My only concern with doing this is the extra weight from using wood.

    Second idea is to cut small pieces of plywood and attach them to the stringers on each side, then pour foam in and then level them off so there is 2 inches of foam above the original height. Then obviously glass over them.

    Anyone have any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Nick
     
  2. steveinak

    steveinak Captain

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    fiberglass angle bolted to stringers ? get some aluminum angle to use for a mold and lay up your own angle.
     
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  3. Tuckerman

    Tuckerman Captain

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    Stringers

    I raised foam filled fiberglass stringers on a 20' sea craft . I cut tops off dug out old foam and built a form lined with wax paper to release foam. Poured foam, shaped and glassed. Worked great. Raised floor 4" .
     
  4. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    I think I will go with a similar approach. I haven't opened up the stringers yet but I'm about 90% sure the foam is junk inside. If that's the case then ill just do that.

    Thanks
    -Nick
     
  5. General Marine Inc.

    General Marine Inc. Senior Member

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    Hey Nick,

    I have a 1995 2090 at the shop that I am going to rebuild in the next few weeks. It will get a nee deck, new foam, and raise the deck an inch or two. If it's helpful to you, come by the shop and take a look once I get the deck and foam out. - Dave
     
  6. restless

    restless Captain

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    What type of resin do you use that won't destroy the foam? I'm guessing epoxy but not sure.
     
  7. leaky

    leaky Captain

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    Assuming this is an older boat, once you rip the deck out be prepared to get into a larger project.

    Usually it goes, remove deck, find wet foam, find rotten stringers, gut/clean, then start by replacing everything under there. Not really a huge project but you may find it's not a simple as raising stringers and replacing the deck - you may find they should be replaced.

    As far as 2X4's - if the existing stringers were wood, ya that's a sane way to go. If they are foam I'd use foam, coosa, airex, something like that. Most likely I'd be using 2 part epoxy, certainly for foam or wood.

    Don't worry about the weight of some 2X4's though - if you are talking non pressure treated an 8 footer only weighs 13 lbs :). You could easily burn up 13 lbs of fiberglass/resin alone attempting to makeup structure if you put weaker material atop the stringer. If your stringers are 1.5 inch thick with wood inside, 2X4's are likely about the lightest way to do it.

    Jon
     
  8. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    Thanks Jon.

    You are correct about it being a larger project. Stringers are glass filled with foam. In the process of removing the foam from the stringers.
     
  9. leaky

    leaky Captain

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    Ahh OK.

    Are you having luck digging the foam out? If that's a real pain you could just cut them out and start over BTW.

    Assuming the above is an OK process - I would get something structural that will fit in the stringer "slot", cut to bring the height up to what you want. Clean everything out the best you can, fill the void with thickened epoxy, and jam the new stringer core in there - then glass over it with 2 part epoxy and a bi-axial and be sure to 100% seal off whatever holes let the water in there to begin with.

    I'd use something like coosa if you want no-wood, or if wood is OK 3 options I see as pretty good are listed below.. BTW I assume that the foam is semi structural or completely non-structural that was in there, otherwise it would have been too dense to soak up water or remove the way you are dong it.

    1. Cedar planks - these are nice because it's extremely light and also rot resistant.

    2. Plywood (strongest) - ideally marine plywood or glue multiple layers of something like 3/16 underlayment, 1/4 or 1/2 exterior plywood; glued together with 2 part epoxy - then you have a plywood that is very straight and waterproof.

    3. Regular old untreated pine lumber - 2X6's or whatever is the right size. Some in maine still build boats w/ this in the stringers - I would not but it is light and strong enough, just it's very prone to rot.

    Jon
     
  10. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    No issue digging the foam out. I think the foam is semi structural for the entire hull. The hull is pretty thin fiberglass. A few patch jobs that really were just half assed. Looks like they attempted to patch a few holes from the bottom side when the foam was still wet. Those spots I could probably push a screw driver through with almost no effort. Glass is all stringy and soft.
     
  11. leaky

    leaky Captain

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    You probably know how do do this, but if you cut the stringer away in that area you can use a piece of waxed hardboard on the outside of the boat to make a perfectly smooth mold, you can then glass from the inside.

    After removing the old patch job grind a 12:1 sized bevel (ie hull thickness 1/2 inch, grind 6 inches around the hole), and lay pieces of glass of varied sizes, going up or down, such to fill the bevel.. ie if you had a long gash it would be thin oval shaped pieces of glass, if you had a single puncture it would be a circle. I would start with the smallest size and work my way up so that the bond is not all the same piece of glass, but it probably does not matter.

    I'd be using 2 part epoxy for this, given it's sub waterline and already failed once. The tricky part with 2 part epoxy though is ideally you put the layers on before the underlying one has cured, such to alleviate the need for prepping in between - which means you need to dedicate a long period of time, like over the course of a weekend, to periodically checking the cure and adding another layer or 2 when it's set in place but still tacky. If you used a fast cure epoxy in relatively warm temperatures you could complete the patch in a 10 hour day no problem though.

    Jon
     
  12. Capt. Rick

    Capt. Rick Senior Member

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    Bassin, I own a Maritime myself. Curious why you need to raise the deck? Maritimes are one of the only true self bailing skiffs made. If your skiff is like mine was, the plywood deck was waterlogged and so was the foam underneath. After we ripped out the deck and dug out the old foam, it must have been 500# or more of weight!
    We put back foam and used the blue billet foam and fitted the pieces in between the composite stringers. That type of foam cannot get waterlogged. We also ran a new larger PVC rigging tube. We redid the deck with
    1/2" Coosa board. After all was said and done, she floats mighty high, even with a new 4 stroke Honda bolted to her transom.....This was a 1999 Maritime that was made with the plywood deck. There are no wood stringers underdecks, Maritime used a composite grid system. The newer Maritimes are all composite. Hope this helped and let me know if you have any questions or concerns.....
     
  13. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    Hey Rick,

    I think I've seen your rebuild some where on the web before. My boat certainly had the same issues. 94 hull, wood completely shot and the foam soaked. I'm raising the deck because I typically load it down with a decent amount of weight. That being said the extra 2 inches will help me out a bit.

    I've also decided that I'm going to only refoam the stringers with closed cell foam and reinforce the rest of the hull with fiberglass to beef up the hull.

    I'm assuming it was bluewater 26? How many layers of glass did you put down?

    Thanks,
    Nick
     
  14. Capt. Rick

    Capt. Rick Senior Member

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    Hey Nick, My skiff was the 19 footer. We used 1/2" Penske Board (same as Coosa) for the deck. I forget the exact laminations used, but I believe it was one layer on the bottom and
    two on the top. We then Awlgripped the inside with Matterhorn White (3 coats) and the outside was the Ice Blue...... The finish was rolled and tipped and looks good. We used
    the griptex product for the non-skid.
     
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  15. Bassin

    Bassin Senior Member

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    About a day away from finishing up grinding. Considering cutting out the existing stringers and replacing them with a new grid. I will be beefing up the hull with 1708 and going no foam. pretty much making the boat a wet bilge. My hull is in pretty bad shape on the outside. Guy who had the boat before me did a lot of 5200 on top of old bottom paint. Pretty cringe to see. 10 gallons of epoxy and lots of glass is what the doctor called for. 4 lb foam for the stringers (if i keep the existing stringers) Should be a fun next couple of weeks. Will keep everyone posted.
     
  16. GSVH747

    GSVH747 Member

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    Hi Nick,

    In the attached YouTube you can see what I did to totally rebuild a one-of-a-kind skiff.
    I got a little carried a way with making this slideshow and if you want to go right to the floor re-leveling part advance to around the 5 min 10 sec part of this 11 minute slideshow.



    I finished the project early in October of this year.
    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Gary
     

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