Riding the storm out

stimmy

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He won't have it long if he leaves it on such an exposed mooring so close to the rocks and shore unless he has a 500 lb mushroom and chafe-proof tackle.
 

BoatPhotog

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He won't have it long if he leaves it on such an exposed mooring so close to the rocks and shore unless he has a 500 lb mushroom and chafe-proof tackle.
In most areas of Maine if you use a 500 lb mushroom you aren't "mooring" your boat you are "parking it temporarily!" A boat this size moored in a windy area requires a 2,500+ lb block of granite.
 

Old Mud

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stimmy

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In most areas of Maine if you use a 500 lb mushroom you aren't "mooring" your boat you are "parking it temporarily!" A boat this size moored in a windy area requires a 2,500+ lb block of granite.
I had a 36' Harris on a 100 lb mushroom for several years and weathered many bad storms without an issue. I had plenty of room to swing. The mushroom sunk several feet into the soft bottom, as it was supposed to, and it required moving a ton of mud to pull it. A block of granite may not sink as well and get covered, due to its size.
 

BoatPhotog

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I had a 36' Harris on a 100 lb mushroom for several years and weathered many bad storms without an issue. I had plenty of room to swing. The mushroom sunk several feet into the soft bottom, as it was supposed to, and it required moving a ton of mud to pull it. A block of granite may not sink as well and get covered, due to its size.
The key term in your reply is "soft bottom." Here in Downeast Maine "soft bottoms" are not easy to find. You are of course correct in saying that a mushroom anchor has tremendous holding power if properly placed in mud. The trick with gramite moorings is to select a block that spreads its weight over a large surface area. The more surface area per thousand lbs the better. "Chunky" moorings have far less holding power.
 

stimmy

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The key term in your reply is "soft bottom." Here in Downeast Maine "soft bottoms" are not easy to find. You are of course correct in saying that a mushroom anchor has tremendous holding power if properly placed in mud. The trick with gramite moorings is to select a block that spreads its weight over a large surface area. The more surface area per thousand lbs the better. "Chunky" moorings have far less holding power.
The boat rode out at least one minor hurricane (only 70 mph winds in Ct), which gave my chafe gear a real workout, but the mooring held. You're right, though; I never dealt with a hard bottom. If you didn't pull the mushroom every year, you'd lose it; it'd sink so deep all your chain would be gone and you'd need a pretty big davit to lift it.
 

SoPoMike

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It will be interesting to see how 'she' holds up today ... if still on the mooring! Pretty good wind and sea today.
 

Old Mud

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