Skiff v.s. Dory

Albert Jr.

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For waters with a 3 to 5 ft chop,
Would you rather have a downeast skiff (Novi skiff etc.) or a Dory ? both 15 to16 ft long.

One person told me that a Dory would be better because of it's handling
characteristics but I'm having doubts.
Reason is that the Skiff has a flatter bottom and a wider surface which is in the water.

Thanks in advance,
Albert Jr.
 
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sailor of fortune

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The dory has Horrible initial stability. They get more stable (reserve stability) as they gain weight. They are hard to "board" from a mother ship. Don't even try to power one, that is not what they were designed for.They will drown you.
Dorys' were superb at their mission,being able to be loaded to the gunwhales with cod and a couple dorymen, being able to be stacked on inside each other on deck, and being able to take seas with a load. Think Howard Blackburn.
When you say "Novi" skiff, I assume you will be powering it, as I don't know of any rowing versions of these boats. Good for their mission, inshore fishing. Bosboatman has a 25' version of one.

Both of these types of boats are designed for specific uses. They excel at INTENDED use. It is when they are "improved" by owners for something completely different, that the problems arise. Then they are labelled as shitty boats.
 

Toolate

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Albert, are you considering/comparing 2 specific boats? WHat do you plan to do with them?

3-5' chop is pretty steep in any 16' boat IMO. Only have experience in a 16' Amesbury and the best trick was to sit to one side and get it to heel over away from the wind which would sort of put the chine into the waves and raise the windward gunwale a bit to keep you a little (tiny bit) dryer. Wet either way in much smaller waves. Boat would pound hard too with flat bottom if you went too fast..
 
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Albert Jr.

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Thanks everyone.
We will be powering the boat and it will mostly see inland waters.
Our inland waters can have 3 feet of chop (which actually happens frequently)
Our primary intention is to use it to test our outboards that we sell, service and repair.

I added a chop to 5 feet because I know that my clients will be interested in buying a
similar boat.

Most of my clients are fisherman who although fish close to the
coast, they fish at the north side of the island.

The hulls they use are homebuild from old sail boat plans one person once in so many years before had.
Even their ''lobster boats'' have the hull of an old sailing boat.
Most of them power their boats with a max. of 15 hp but their are a few who power
them with 25 hp.

They don't run fast because they troll for fish while going to their fishing spots.
 
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sailor of fortune

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You won,t want a dory. A well set up is a paine in the ass, as well as dangerous on these hulls. If you are talking about something else and calling it a dory, then it may be worth it. Some people call Amesbury skiffs, dorys, which they are not.
You ought to get one of the local discarded salboat hulls like your customers do. They sound inexpensive and suitable.
 

Albert Jr.

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You won,t want a dory. A well set up is a paine in the ass, as well as dangerous on these hulls. If you are talking about something else and calling it a dory, then it may be worth it. Some people call Amesbury skiffs, dorys, which they are not.
You ought to get one of the local discarded salboat hulls like your customers do. They sound inexpensive and suitable.

They sell the sailboat hulls here for around $2500 without engine.
They are suitable but they are heavy, unstable and imo outdated.

I'm talking about boats like the oceaneer mk2 when talking about dory's
The person I asked about it told me it was called a dory.
 
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sailor of fortune

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BlisscraftOceaneer.jpg
If this is the boat your friend is talking about, it is nice...but it is not a dory.
 
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sailor of fortune

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These banks dories have tombstone transoms. No way are you going to attach power unless its in an added well. Notice the v in the bow of your friends boat, dories are flat bottom all the way fwd.
 

Albert Jr.

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These banks dories have tombstone transoms. No way are you going to attach power unless its in an added well. Notice the v in the bow of your friends boat, dories are flat bottom all the way fwd.

Thanks alot.
 

sevenjohn

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Albert,
There was a company called Glen-L that used to produce skiff plans. Most of the plans called for plywood as the building materials for the hull...the plans usually showed models with a motor well(like a carolina skiff) and with a transom mount outboard. The boats used small outboards for power. I do not know if the outfit is still in business. google them?
 

Albert Jr.

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Albert,
There was a company called Glen-L that used to produce skiff plans. Most of the plans called for plywood as the building materials for the hull...the plans usually showed models with a motor well(like a carolina skiff) and with a transom mount outboard. The boats used small outboards for power. I do not know if the outfit is still in business. google them?

Yes I know them well and they are still in business.
 
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