Soda blasting?

Robo

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Anybody have any experience with blasting a lot of layers or bottom paint down to glass, then barrier coating. I think I want it done on my 30 Sisu. Any barrier coat better than others? Is soda blasting the way to go?

Robo
 

CEShawn

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Get good referrals just was looking into add at a local marina and on Craigslist. Guy gung go then asked about finished product and couldn't tell me what the level was like for me to barrier coat...I think there r some new People out there
 

jerseysportfisher

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I like soda blasting myself, but one thing you have to extra attentive about is soda blasting requires an extensive washdown cut with vinegar, if not you dont get good paint adhesion. I know a few by me have switched to shell blasting, don't know the pro's and con's fir that
 

jawz

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I like soda blasting myself, but one thing you have to extra attentive about is soda blasting requires an extensive washdown cut with vinegar, if not you dont get good paint adhesion. I know a few by me have switched to shell blasting, don't know the pro's and con's fir that

never heard this ?

i've lost count of the boats,i've had both sand and soda blasted - after a "finish sand",to remove the remaining residue,a solvent wipe down

i've never had an adhesion problem

i've seen a few "half ass" jobs done - by both so called "pros" and do it yourselfers - this was before interprotect 2000e - the first formula,of interprotect,it had a "window" before it blushed and required sanding - a failure to follw that,resulted in the antifouling paint peeling off.

just be aware,the barrier should be 10m thick -number of coats is meaningless - use both colors,grey and white,alternate these colors to assure a full and complete coverage...
 

petrel

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The latest greatest thing down here is a wet blasting w/ volcanic ash. I've been told you can then just roll the barrier coat on w/o have to go and sand the surface first. Soda blasting was the preferred method before that, but left a slick surface that needed to be sanded.
 

jawz

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The latest greatest thing down here is a wet blasting w/ volcanic ash. I've been told you can then just roll the barrier coat on w/o have to go and sand the surface first. Soda blasting was the preferred method before that, but left a slick surface that needed to be sanded.


never seen that

a blasted surface has a "profile" to it,nothing slick,or smooth...
 

jawz

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let me add this:

the reason for sanding,after blasting,is to remove the remaining paint residue - there's gonna be spots where the paint wasn't fully removed,by the blasting process.
has nothing to do with roughing the surface.

nothing will adhere to antifouling paint,left on the surface...
 

jerseysportfisher

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never heard this ?

i've lost count of the boats,i've had both sand and soda blasted - after a "finish sand",to remove the remaining residue,a solvent wipe down

i've never had an adhesion problem

i've seen a few "half ass" jobs done - by both so called "pros" and do it yourselfers - this was before interprotect 2000e - the first formula,of interprotect,it had a "window" before it blushed and required sanding - a failure to follw that,resulted in the antifouling paint peeling off.

just be aware,the barrier should be 10m thick -number of coats is meaningless - use both colors,grey and white,alternate these colors to assure a full and complete coverage...


something i learned back in my autobody days, SB leaves a residue on the surface, very hard to get of with a standard wash, i learned from an ol timer to cut the wash with 15% vinegar solution. Works great, maybe you don't need it in the marine biz ? fiberglass is more pourus then metal, i do it out of habbit, then again your sanding after blasting, that will takes any residue off.
 

petrel

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Unlike you guys, I have not seen the direct result of soda blasting, but I assume he was talking about the residue making it slick and that there is no residue using the wet blast I was talking about. Good to have some clarification b/c it didn't make sense to me for it to be slick from blasting, but now it does. I've seen a bottom just after the wet blast and there was not any sign of adhered paint or residue.
 

jerseysportfisher

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Soda blasting results

Cats Media blasted and painted

catbeforepaint.jpg

catafterpaint.jpg




Genset hold ,cleaned patched gelcoated

genarea.jpg



genareagelcoated2.jpg
 

jerseysportfisher

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Her ya go Jimmy, found this, has more of the science involved

powder Coating

Now that you soda blasted your project, what is the next step?


I get this question almost daily and, in the beginning, I did not have the correct answers. In the past, I was told many things; from "just don't worry about it" to, "just plain water" or "vinegar and water" (nobody knew the correct ratio) and even alcohol and water. I now know that there isn't a single stock answer to this question as there are many different kinds of substrates that we encounter with soda blasting and each one has its own treatment.

The main question to ask - is a coating going to be re-applied? If so, some sort of neutralizing and cleaning of the surface needs to be done. Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) has a higher than neutral pH and contains some degree of salt (chlorides). You must have a clean, oil free and pH neutral surface to ensure that you won't have a coatings failure after any type of media blasting. Coating failures after soda blasting can usually be traced back to no pre-paint preparation, poor preparation or incorrect preparation. Baking soda is a wonderful media that allows you to do things that no other media will accomplish, but you need to educate yourself about the media and follow a few simple steps after blasting. Consulting with coatings manufacturers before application can reveal a wealth of valuable information and help insure a positive outcome to your project.

Here is a sampling of substrates and
what we have found that works after soda blasting:


Metals - Hold Tight 102 is the best all around product that we have found. POR-15 Marine Clean might also work.
Fiberglass - Hold Tight 102 and possibly Salt Away and Salt-X. Also Fiberglass Surface Prep #YMA601 by Interlux.
Wood - Sun Brite Wood Brightener - a citrus based wood bleach. Can be also used to brighten wood and remove rust stains.
Concrete - Hold Tight 102 or Sun Brite Wood Brightener.
Brick, block & mortar - Sun Brite Wood Brightener.
Links to the products mentioned can be found on our "links" page. Additional products that can be identified may be used. Please check with the product manufacturer regarding the proper use and application of other products.
A quick message regarding vegetation:

Baking soda can burn vegetation due to the pH of the product. Flowering plants that are more delicate seem to be more quickly affected. Leafy green plantings and common lawn grass seem less likely affected. Having said this, all vegetation can be affected by baking soda residue to different degrees depending on how much baking soda contacts the surface or ground. Use of breathable tarps to cover plantings around houses and decks works well. Follow removal of the tarps with a copious tap water wash down of the plantings. In areas where tarping is not practical, start with a pre-soaking of the plantings and ground the day before with tap water. Flood all plantings with tap water immediately after blasting. We have even used a lawn sprinkler to keep baking soda residue off plantings and to keep the ground wet during blasting operations. Baking soda is water soluble and use of additive free baking soda, like Natrium Products, will increase the likelihood of a good outcome.

There is no guarantee that you won't burn vegetation with the above mentioned techniques - these are just some ideas that have worked for us. I always caution my customers about the possibility of burning the vegetation. Because of what we can do with baking soda, most customers are happy to deal with any possible side effects.
 
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