Thoughts and Opinions on SeaCraft 23 Inboard

tunaorlater

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My family has had 7 seacrafts over the years that we’ve redone. None were inboards but they say the inboard rides the best. Maintenance is an issue as stated above. You can’t find a better riding boat in its class as far as I’m concerned. But they are small with a 8’ beam. This is what my father did to the one he has now with that console.

4D4A82ED-1317-4651-9491-6D483D9ABF79.jpeg

43644BAF-2940-485A-AC1C-F9E250E4CB38.jpeg
 

Parry Marine

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I have the same engine (2019, but MPI and FWC like this one) in my 23 Seacraft Inboard, and I can tell you first hand the engine is excellent. Pushes mine 20-22 knots with ease and tops out at 30-32 knots pending sea conditions. Console in mine flips all the way forward, and there's zero issues getting to anything maintenance wise. Fuel economy is 1.75 to 2.0 mpg.

Awesome boats, the ride of these hulls with the straight inboard is excellent with the centered engine weight. Definitely slower than the outboard models, but the quality of the ride in rough conditions is top notch.
 

Parry Marine

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I didn't even notice that the engine isn't FWC....yeah that changes some of the servicing calculus for sure.

Just a note, these engines have the heat exchanger located on the back of the engine as opposed to more commonly seen on the front. Hard to tell from the pics posted, but the anti-freeze overfill is located on the back of the respirator cover (Black cap, plastic container).

The norm for riser change out is 5 years per the shop I use with regular boat use. If the boat doesn't see much action then that interval can decrease.
 

Frank Grimes

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Just a note, these engines have the heat exchanger located on the back of the engine as opposed to more commonly seen on the front. Hard to tell from the pics posted, but the anti-freeze overfill is located on the back of the respirator cover (Black cap, plastic container).

The norm for riser change out is 5 years per the shop I use with regular boat use. If the boat doesn't see much action then that interval can decrease.
Good to know, thanks for the clarification
 

xbskt

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Would the plugs be easy to change? No not likely.
Would it be impossible for an average mechanic?
No. Thats what they make swivels and extensions for
Would it be a reason not to buy an inboard Seacraft.
Absolutlely not.
Best 23 foot hull you can buy in my humble opinion.
Outboards with original transom tend to get swamped when on a mooring.
An inboard is a rare bird and very desirable.
If I was looking for a 23 Seacraft this is the one I would buy.
Ask the seller about maintenace and the Cooling system. He likely will give you all the answers to the straight forward questions.
Like they say, try it, you"ll like it.
 

Dorado

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Awesome boat. I had a bracketed 23 Seacraft in 2019 and a straight inboard with a 6.0 Crusader in 2020. The bracketed boat wasn’t even in the same category as the inboard, at least IMO. It was setup right with a Hermco bracket, but didn’t have the sea keeping characteristics of the inboard. The Crusader manifolds are usually FWC. So 3-5 year maintenance is typically risers only. Is this the one in Weymouth? That’s a heck of a boat given the entire driveline was professionally refit.
 

hardcore1

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That crusader is one of the most basic engines to maintain. Risers every 5 years plugs wire as needed or every two years. Distributor is another maintenance item. If your mechanic can not work in that engine then he is most likely just a parts changer kind of guy. These are the simplest easiest engines to keep going and will last longer than you think. That engine and boat combo is a winning combination
 

stumpstalker

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Raider: The 1970s -era, Potter-design all did, I assume. Afterwards, I do not know.
___

The 23-foot inboard Seacraft hull averages about 20 degrees of variable deadrise -- steps from the “keel” to the first strake about 25-30 degrees; second step about 16-18 degrees; out-board step about 12-14 degrees.

As a single-engined, open, pocket fishing machine, it may be in a class-alone. Any challenger to that preeminence is probably a derivation of it.



Not just going to windward in a chop, but with a following sea --- Southerly rollers piling up on the way in from offshore -- the boat steers like it is on a railroad track. That tunnel underneath her is like having two keels, for tracking purposes.


double.hit.pulpit.jpg
 

Plastered

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Brooksie

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Raider: The 1970s -era, Potter-design all did, I assume. Afterwards, I do not know.
___

The 23-foot inboard Seacraft hull averages about 20 degrees of variable deadrise -- steps from the “keel” to the first strake about 25-30 degrees; second step about 16-18 degrees; out-board step about 12-14 degrees.

As a single-engined, open, pocket fishing machine, it may be in a class-alone. Any challenger to that preeminence is probably a derivation of it.



Not just going to windward in a chop, but with a following sea --- Southerly rollers piling up on the way in from offshore -- the boat steers like it is on a railroad track. That tunnel underneath her is like having two keels, for tracking purposes.


View attachment 103548
I always wondered about the bottoms on Seacraft with each bottom panel having less deadrise moving away from the center. Seems counterintuitive. Any idea what the thinking was behind this?
 

Dorado

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Variable deadrise, it’s a design that was ahead of its time and still used today. Deep V at the keel, I believe 21 degrees, with steps flattening out for stability as well as efficiency. It’s a lot of boat for 23’. It won’t run as well as an old Formula or Seavee, but it’s stability on the drift balances out its capabilities extremely well.
 

stumpstalker

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Variable deadrise, it’s a design that was ahead of its time and still used today. Deep V at the keel, I believe 21 degrees, with steps flattening out for stability as well as efficiency. It’s a lot of boat for 23’. It won’t run as well as an old Formula or Seavee, but it’s stability on the drift balances out its capabilities extremely well.
Dorado answers Brooksie's question exactly right. I would only add the corollary that with the variable deadrise it is easier to achieve a plane with the 23-foot Seacraft inboard, than with a Formula or Bertram Moppie-design, which also translates to a fuel savings.
 

Squider42

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On our 23ft with an OMC outdrive, I noticed with a lighter load it would get up and go with a great ride, but suffered with a heavier load. I think it is one of the best rides and designs with enough horsepower. We should have changed out the OMC with a bigger Merc with more HP.
Side note: Anyone ever have this problem on those OMC's outdrives, when you would give it too much throttle too quickly it stripped the teeth of of one of the shafts?
 

Brooksie

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Quote: "Dorado answers Brooksie's question exactly right. I would only add the corollary that with the variable deadrise it is easier to achieve a plane with the 23-foot Seacraft inboard, than with a Formula or Bertram Moppie-design, which also translates to a fuel savings"

Did you know that the first Ray Hunt deep V's had centerboards to keep them from rolling at rest?
 

Brooksie

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1958, the boat was HUNTER, she made her first outing at Newport Americas Cup. Dick Bertram was there and saw Hunter but had no connection with Hunt at the time. Hunt designed many more b/4 helater designed for Bertram such as Stingray and SurfHunters. All wood.
As to how the centerboard worked in Hunter, I imagine in a capped trunk pulled up with a light line when you were at speed.
 
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