Ultimate offshore lobster boat

Jesse lowell

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It would be cool to hear a discussion about the perfect size of an offshore lobster boat from all the fisherman on this site!! I love insight from the folks that have to be out for days on a boat us designers create while sitting in a chair!
 
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Powderpro

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If money is not an issue, the bigger the better. If we are talking $1 Million or under, I would take something in the 43'-46' length, 15' wide.
 

Jesse lowell

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If money is not an issue, the bigger the better. If we are talking $1 Million or under, I would take something in the 43'-46' length, 15' wide.
If money wasn't an issue you wouldn't but anything bigger then 46?
 

Powderpro

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If money wasn't an issue you wouldn't but anything bigger then 46?

If money were not an issue, I would go way bigger than 46', that's why I said bigger is better. When you are out on the ocean, and the weather kicks up, 46' isn't all that big. I don't commercial lobster fish, so I'm not qualified to answer the question, but if I did lobster and had the money, I would go for a 54' Wesmac.

Although, last time I spoke with Steve, seems like he said a new 60' Wesmac (50' stretched) was in the works. So maybe I would go 60' instead.
 

Diesel Jerry

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DotRat

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I would second bigger is better. I have never fished offshore but I have seen plenty offshore running boats and the bigger one gets you through the snot a lot easier!
 
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plowin

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If money wasnt an issue I wouldn’t be trying to make a living off the water. Its awfully hard on the body and harder on the family. I would be floating around a pool someplace where when you say the word Corona they bring a cold beer instead of squirting you with disinfectant.
 

steveinak

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if it was me i'd be looking at something like one of those bering sea crabbers, big, tanked down, no outriggers. Those old Gladding Hern RI Marine steel boats sure seemed to be nice rigs for that fishery. If looking for glass boats then a lot of those west coast dugeness crab boats fishing the winter off of washington & oregon sure fish in some shitty weather and cross some terrible bars in that fishery.
 

CCtuna

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I second the shafty boat. Those things are absolute tanks. Those boats will fish through any weather short of a major hurricane as far as I know. I think it’s pretty proven/accepted that the lobsters are shifting north and East.
 

Fouraces59

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It would be cool to hear a discussion about the perfect size of an offshore lobster boat from all the fisherman on this site!! I love insight from the folks that have to be out for days on a boat us designers create while sitting in a chair!
So when you say offshore are you thinking 30-50 miles, Gray Zone between Maine and Nov Scotia or are you thinking 100+ miles, Georges and the Canyons?

In the early seventies my dad fished Georges for Western Ocean out of Gloucester. The Western Ocean and Western Wave (still around as a herring boat I think) were steel and in the 75' range. He also ran a wooden converted shrimper the Sea Dog that was 72' I think. Later he fished there for one season on a 35' Ralph Stanley which was the original Miss Julie while the owner was building a 55' Marine Management. Later the current Miss Julie that fishes out of the Sandwich Basin was built as a 68' Aluminum by Gladding & Hearn, current owners stretched it to 72' I think. He made one more season on Georges in late 70's on a 42 Bruno the McCaffery, still inshore lobstering and Pogie fishing out of Hull, MA so it can be done in any size. However, I would say for out there ideally 70'-75" steel seems be the most common and economical. These guys are probably fishing 40 pot trawls and 12-1400 traps, too far to run in after one haul through so may lay to for a day and then rehaul making it a 5-7 +/- day trip. the McKInley fishing out of New Bedford was an Alaskan Crab boat, Similar to the Northwestern with the house forward is 100'+, not sure if it might be too big for the type of fishing but probably the most comfy to work on.

For the 30-50 mile / Gray Zone fishery, minimum of 42' and up to 55' fiberglass. The economics of building and running wouldn't work for a big steel boat I don't think. These guys are limited to 800 traps so if you are trip fishing you are only spending one night offshore and might even work through the night or just do long days if you have enough speed and the economics allow for you to use the speed.
 

TAftw

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I always liked the looks of those old Rhode Island Marine boats. A couple of them still kicking around
 

Frank Grimes

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So when you say offshore are you thinking 30-50 miles, Gray Zone between Maine and Nov Scotia or are you thinking 100+ miles, Georges and the Canyons?

In the early seventies my dad fished Georges for Western Ocean out of Gloucester. The Western Ocean and Western Wave (still around as a herring boat I think) were steel and in the 75' range. He also ran a wooden converted shrimper the Sea Dog that was 72' I think. Later he fished there for one season on a 35' Ralph Stanley which was the original Miss Julie while the owner was building a 55' Marine Management. Later the current Miss Julie that fishes out of the Sandwich Basin was built as a 68' Aluminum by Gladding & Hearn, current owners stretched it to 72' I think. He made one more season on Georges in late 70's on a 42 Bruno the McCaffery, still inshore lobstering and Pogie fishing out of Hull, MA so it can be done in any size. However, I would say for out there ideally 70'-75" steel seems be the most common and economical. These guys are probably fishing 40 pot trawls and 12-1400 traps, too far to run in after one haul through so may lay to for a day and then rehaul making it a 5-7 +/- day trip. the McKInley fishing out of New Bedford was an Alaskan Crab boat, Similar to the Northwestern with the house forward is 100'+, not sure if it might be too big for the type of fishing but probably the most comfy to work on.

For the 30-50 mile / Gray Zone fishery, minimum of 42' and up to 55' fiberglass. The economics of building and running wouldn't work for a big steel boat I don't think. These guys are limited to 800 traps so if you are trip fishing you are only spending one night offshore and might even work through the night or just do long days if you have enough speed and the economics allow for you to use the speed.

Good post. Miss Julie, William Bowe, Rachel Leah, Mister Marco, Virginia Marie......all very similar designs that go way offshore.
 

sailor of fortune

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Fiberglass is nice but steel is real...

wasn't it Bob Brown that said something like: wood boats are for romance of the sea type stuff,,give me steel offshore.... After he blew the windows out of his Novi boat on Georges Bank.
 

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