Used boat value??

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power
Hello ALL,

Many of you know I've been considering a 2nd boat.
Something small, 22ish feet, full keel DE.

I have my eyes on a couple/three 22 Webber Coves.
A couple trailers, a big plus for me as far as winter storage, moving around etc.

All are "lobster boat configurations", open starboard and either open or closed port side.

3 have gas V8 power, varying power 5.0,5.8,5.7 blocks, BW Velvet Drives, 16X18 three blades etc. variable hours. One has a 4 cyl yanmar (not a lot of info on the engine)
Boats are 1993 through 99. Original power. Various electronics etc.
Simple boats.
Tanks are aluminum or fiberglass (yes ethanol concerns)
Asking prices are between 25K-35K.
Boats have been on the market for sometime

My question, not easily answered, taking the emotions out of a purchase, what are today's "buy values" in today's soft market. If I buy one of these I may need to resell it in a year or two and DO NOT want to take a big haircut on the resale.

Here are some pics of the various boats.
My opinion is maybe $20K-23K with trailer??? And expect to spend a few bucks to "spruce up"?

IMG_3701.jpg

IMG_3702.jpg

IMG_3700.jpg

22 Webbers Cove Helm.jpg
 

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power
The last of the assorted pics of a 22 Webbers Cove.

If you have enough info without looking @ the boats in person,
place a $value$.

I don't make my living with boats, no write offs, tax advantages etc. LOL
I've come to the conclusion that is this market my 31 Blackfin even with new Cummins 370 power is worth "$squat$...and is worth way more to me than anyone else................................!.....
and that a 2nd little used boat with trailer is the way to go for now to suit my boating needs.

The used boat market is no different the the used home market.
To sell a used boat/home right now and build new boat (considering ALL the existing inventory) just doesn't add up.
And yes, unless you make a living @ it, boating is just expensive recreation!

Thanks, Bill D

22 Webber Cove 351 Ford.jpg

22 Webbers Cove Yanmar.jpg

Sea Fox 15.jpg

Sea Fox 12.jpg
 
Last edited:

JoFishes

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Seaway, Kinnamon, Carolina
Bill,
Would you ever consider a "turnkey", bracketted outboard powered DE. No engine box to eat up your cockpit and tons of deckspace, not to mention a pretty shallow draft too?? Jo:?:
 
Last edited:

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power
Bill,
Would you ever consider a "turnkey", bracketted outboard powered DE. No engine box to eat up your cockpit and tons of deckspace, not to mention a pretty shallow draft too?? Jo:?:
I'm a "traditionalist",, I want a DE inboard keel boat,,
but, what do you have?
I see your avatar but can't really make out what boat you have?

Thanks, Bill D
 

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power

F/V First Team

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Hmm, used boats. What are the worth? They are worth the cost of the pieces that make them up, being a hull and a top usually. So as long as those are both sound, that's where the price should start.

Electronics: I discount any electronics on board because let's face it, they are probably outdated and possibly are not what you prefer to use - everyone is different after all. If they work - great, if you can make them work for you - even better. However if there is a need for them to be replaced (don't use the term "updated" because when you "update" electronics you're just putting a brand spanking new one in place of the one that needed "updating" and in my book that's called replacing, plain and simple) then that cost comes off the cream and makes your bottom line go up.

Mechanical: Dust? Seriously? Why is there dust on something in a boat? I can see if it's been in the shop and there has been some grinding going on but a boat should be fairly dust-free. Has it been on the hard for so long that it has built up or has it been neglected for so long while being operated in the water that it has accumulated on things. Suspicious stains halfway up the engine room makes me pause as well, more so when they're redishbrown or black (green REALLY makes one wonder). If you can poke your finger down behind the coupling and wiggle around in there that could be a good indication of how the boat was kept up. How you ask? Simple, it's a pain in the behind to clean up in there so people don't, if your finger comes out fairly clean then things have gone okie-dokie for the life of the boat. If it comes out looking like something you'd scrape off your shoe after a jog in the park, well, there has been some strange ju-ju going on down in that bilge my friend. A quick peek inside bilge pump screens can also help out, but pumps can be replaced quite easily. Anything below deck that needs to be replaced, estimate how long it would take you, then double it. Multiply that by 100. There's your estimated labor cost. Any hose that might have less than desirable liquid running through it, be it ultra hot, salty, or otherwise unmentionable, those hoses in question should be double clamped - all hoses realistically, but these ones for sure.

Wiring: Green is the color of money. If you seen green wires plan on spending some serious green. Electrical tape - unless it's holding bundles of wire together to keep things ship shape, it should be investigated. It is good stuff for emergencies and quick fixes, however they should be fixed after the vessel reaches shore. Zip ties are the same way, I've seen too many jury rigged systems on fisherman's boats over the years to ignore these things.

Luxury items: Is there a screen on them? See electronics. Do they require pumping of any sort? (electrical or manual) see below deck estimation formula above. Black splotches on things, well that requires bleach (or something even more nefarious) but should be ok - take a peek inside if there's a zipper though, you wouldn't believe what cushions will absorb over time. Bring gloves.

Hardware: Be suspect of anything that is a different flavor than those around it. Case in point six cleats on a boat, 5 are Herreshoff and one is a flat top cleat. There's a story here, and quite possibly a hole underneath. Fishing rods and other paraphernalia I really don't know what to tell you about that aside from the obvious. Rust and upkeep things.

Anything wrong on the boat: Make a fist, figure out how many fists the object/area in question is made up of, multiply by 100 - that's a deduction. Windows are roughly 300 to replace, be they aluminum framed or rubber set.

Exterior: If there is excessive growth on the bottom due to sitting, chances are there is growth in other portions of the vessel that also contain water (i.e. water strainer/heat exchanger if equipped). Different pigments of bottom paint may conceal a secret, also bumps should be observed and investigated if present. A pocket knife helps these areas, good for scraping and poking. Blisters are one thing, fiberglass patches are another.

If possible get a ride on the vessel, if that isn't in the cards get it to run or at least start, if that isn't viable either... well... You might be on your own.

I am not a surveyor, I am not a used boat broker/dealer, these are just considerations I would personally use if I were in that position to purchase a boat that someone else had before me.
 

BillD

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25 Terry Jason with Cummins 370 power
Hmm, used boats. What are the worth? They are worth the cost of the pieces that make them up, being a hull and a top usually. So as long as those are both sound, that's where the price should start.

Electronics: I discount any electronics on board because let's face it, they are probably outdated and possibly are not what you prefer to use - everyone is different after all. If they work - great, if you can make them work for you - even better. However if there is a need for them to be replaced (don't use the term "updated" because when you "update" electronics you're just putting a brand spanking new one in place of the one that needed "updating" and in my book that's called replacing, plain and simple) then that cost comes off the cream and makes your bottom line go up.

Mechanical: Dust? Seriously? Why is there dust on something in a boat? I can see if it's been in the shop and there has been some grinding going on but a boat should be fairly dust-free. Has it been on the hard for so long that it has built up or has it been neglected for so long while being operated in the water that it has accumulated on things. Suspicious stains halfway up the engine room makes me pause as well, more so when they're redishbrown or black (green REALLY makes one wonder). If you can poke your finger down behind the coupling and wiggle around in there that could be a good indication of how the boat was kept up. How you ask? Simple, it's a pain in the behind to clean up in there so people don't, if your finger comes out fairly clean then things have gone okie-dokie for the life of the boat. If it comes out looking like something you'd scrape off your shoe after a jog in the park, well, there has been some strange ju-ju going on down in that bilge my friend. A quick peek inside bilge pump screens can also help out, but pumps can be replaced quite easily. Anything below deck that needs to be replaced, estimate how long it would take you, then double it. Multiply that by 100. There's your estimated labor cost. Any hose that might have less than desirable liquid running through it, be it ultra hot, salty, or otherwise unmentionable, those hoses in question should be double clamped - all hoses realistically, but these ones for sure.

Wiring: Green is the color of money. If you seen green wires plan on spending some serious green. Electrical tape - unless it's holding bundles of wire together to keep things ship shape, it should be investigated. It is good stuff for emergencies and quick fixes, however they should be fixed after the vessel reaches shore. Zip ties are the same way, I've seen too many jury rigged systems on fisherman's boats over the years to ignore these things.

Luxury items: Is there a screen on them? See electronics. Do they require pumping of any sort? (electrical or manual) see below deck estimation formula above. Black splotches on things, well that requires bleach (or something even more nefarious) but should be ok - take a peek inside if there's a zipper though, you wouldn't believe what cushions will absorb over time. Bring gloves.

Hardware: Be suspect of anything that is a different flavor than those around it. Case in point six cleats on a boat, 5 are Herreshoff and one is a flat top cleat. There's a story here, and quite possibly a hole underneath. Fishing rods and other paraphernalia I really don't know what to tell you about that aside from the obvious. Rust and upkeep things.

Anything wrong on the boat: Make a fist, figure out how many fists the object/area in question is made up of, multiply by 100 - that's a deduction. Windows are roughly 300 to replace, be they aluminum framed or rubber set.

Exterior: If there is excessive growth on the bottom due to sitting, chances are there is growth in other portions of the vessel that also contain water (i.e. water strainer/heat exchanger if equipped). Different pigments of bottom paint may conceal a secret, also bumps should be observed and investigated if present. A pocket knife helps these areas, good for scraping and poking. Blisters are one thing, fiberglass patches are another.

If possible get a ride on the vessel, if that isn't in the cards get it to run or at least start, if that isn't viable either... well... You might be on your own.

I am not a surveyor, I am not a used boat broker/dealer, these are just considerations I would personally use if I were in that position to purchase a boat that someone else had before me.
Yup, covered those things and more with my Blackfin !.
 

WoundUpMarine

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