Why do lobster pots look the way they do?

MAArcher

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A dumb newbie question, but how come lobster pots are so big and heavy? Why don't traps like the crab trap in this video work?

Also I have a hauler like the one in the video and got it thinking I can flip it on its back to use with a davit. Anyone see an issue with that? I'll have to relocate the power switch but that should be easy..
 

Genius

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so they don't move on the bottom. IDK why crab traps are so lightweight.
 

El Mar

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CCtuna

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I know guys fishing 10 brick 3 footers in the Piscataqua. I think shafty traps are in the 150lb ballpark
 

Genius

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our offshore trawls had wood double parlor ends pots, with double bricks (can't recall the amount of bricks). We called them bear pots. Try stacking those 4 high when bringing gear home for a storm.
 

Dano62

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our offshore trawls had wood double parlor ends pots, with double bricks (can't recall the amount of bricks). We called them bear pots. Try stacking those 4 high when bringing gear home for a storm.
Five high or die!
 

Dano62

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I know guys fishing 10 brick 3 footers in the Piscataqua. I think shafty traps are in the 150lb ballpark
I spent a winter back in the mid 90's building traps at Shafmaster before they made the switch to wire. They were 4' long x 32" (base width) x 26" (top width) x 18" high, 4 bricks, and made of pressure treated oak. Can't remember what they weighed, but we stacked 10 (5 high) on a pallet. Sometimes, the batch of oak we got was pretty dry and every time you drove a nail with the coil nailer, it would send up a cloud of green dust. I have no idea how much copper and arsenic I breathed in, even with a dust mask.

When I used to fish up river, my three footers had 8 bricks and my four footers had 10, and the big tides would still move them, sometimes over a hundred yards.
 
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