Winter Skiff Project

Discussion in 'Skiffs and Small Work Boats' started by Robert Jackson, Nov 14, 2018.

  1. Robert Jackson

    Robert Jackson Member

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    Occupation:
    Retired Deputy Fire Chief / EMT
    Location:
    Portsmouth, NH
    Boat Make:
    BMH 32
    This is my son's and my winter project. We are 6 weeks into it. The vessel is about 18 ft. White oak from a local NH mill. We roughly followed the Total Boat youtube series. Watched it 3 times while taking notes. Built a scaled model (little blue boat on the temporary horizontal brace). Pulled the dimensions from the model to create scaled drawings. Built her from there. It's our first ever boat we've built.

    My dad's retired yellow CT lobstering flag is watching over our project. I'm sure he is smiling.

    This will be our beat around boat when not on our BHM 32 hacking around.

    NOV 13 2018.jpg
     
    TedFJ40, Old Mud, Toolate and 9 others like this.
  2. Keelboater

    Keelboater Captain

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    Not too shabby for a couple of first timers! Keep the pictures coming. :cool:
     
  3. Sleepwalker

    Sleepwalker Member

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    Looks like she'll be pretty rugged. And a nice roomy work area!
     
  4. Old Mud

    Old Mud Captain

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    Ho Made
    Rugged for sure, she will be a Fine boat. You'll Always remember your first !! :)
     
  5. Mahogany addict

    Mahogany addict Member

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    19' custom wooden skiff
    Quick question about your side planking that appears to be sticking out on the starb side,, Is that truly what I am looking at, or a shadow? If its not a shadow, then you will need to either scarf the two adjoining planking stock together or use a butt block on the inside, adjoining the two planks at the butt.
     
  6. Robert Jackson

    Robert Jackson Member

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    BMH 32
    Good for you for noticing! It is almost impossible to aquire 20 ft white oak planks so we needed to scarf planks, rails, chins to make the lengths. What you see is temporary reinforcing we added outside while bending the planks into place. We are going to keep the ones inside but remove the outside ones once we turn the boat over soon to plank the bottom. It would have been so much easier with the long material, but it was fun to learn to cut the scarfs, especially on the chins which have compound angles. We did well and didn't waste much. We are getting close to picking thru the 5/4 cedar boards at the mill for the bottom. Clear cedar sure is a challenge to find. We'd use either cedar or fir. We've already cut the lift rails which will be put on once the hull is trued up. I'll post some updated photos soon.
     
  7. Mahogany addict

    Mahogany addict Member

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    For the bottom planks ideally if you can find quarter sawn planks it is to your advantage. Its is the most stable while being structurally sound. You can actually create your own quarter sawn planks from flat sawn lumber, which is actually the cheapest and most avaliable unless you are dealing directly with a sawmill or good lumberyard. Find the widest planks, say 10 inches of the flat or plain sawn and then you can rip it down the middle and this will give you close to the quarter sawn lumber.

    If you use the flat sawn lumber, then turn the grain upward or what is known as upside down.. The weakest grain orientation while being stable is rift sawn or vertical grain. When running fasteners into the ends your wood will normally split down the grain lines. What type of fasteners are you using? And last depending on the type of cedar, some acceptable pin knots are fine. Are you finding air or kiln dried timber? For some quick reference if you are not too familiar with cutting logs,
    http://www.hardwooddistributors.org/blog/postings/what-is-the-difference-between-quarter-sawn-rift-sawn-and-plain-sawn-lumber/
     
  8. Robert Jackson

    Robert Jackson Member

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    Yes, we have the quarter sawn lumber. Thank you for the data.
    We are using air dried lumber.
    Also, we are using SST Screws.
     

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