What's that they say about boats being holes in the water you through money into?

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
1,076
Likes
535
Age
50
Location
New England
IMG_0771.PNG

Got her in the water today for a quick 15 minute ride. Not the best trailer for that boat. A little miserable getting it on and off so I think I'm just going to buy a new roller trailer. Pulled the bow eye half out so now I have another project that just jumped to the top of the list. The motor ran great but it seemed like it wasn't pumping water as hard as it should have. Changing the pumps part of the 300 hour service I have to do, so a pump and a thermostat should fix it.

That high bow will take some getting used too. I'm only 5'9" and I can hardly see over the bow.

Ran 30mph at 5k rpm WOT on flat water. May have to swap the prop out for a lower pitch 4 blade.

Hopefully I'll be able to get everything buttoned up soon and get after some fish!
 

tsharac

Lieutenant Commander
Joined
May 9, 2012
Posts
154
Likes
89
Location
Alexandria/Parksley, VA
First Name
Tim
Boat Make
1976 20' Eastporter; 1976 16' Stratford dory
Congratulations!

My E-TEC 40 pours water out of the rear cowling like a drinking water fountain, not a sharp stream like other outboards.

What RPM are you after? I read you should select a prop to hit the "optimum" RPM based on the manual. f you don't have the factory manual, this might help:

Tim
 

CCtuna

Rear Admiral
Joined
Oct 20, 2012
Posts
1,480
Likes
980
Location
Nauset
Boat Make
Some day...
That’s a big upgrade man congrats. I really like that boat
 

ErikT

Captain
Lite User
Joined
Sep 7, 2011
Posts
646
Likes
1,114
Location
New York
First Name
Erik
Boat Make
Crowley Beal 28

leaky

Vice Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
3,938
Likes
1,963
Location
NH
Unless you insist on being super careful (slow) all the time loading, cranking the boat up, and feel it must roll off the trailer on it's own (versus just letting it float off) usually bunk trailers are a lot easier to deal with.

A well setup bunk trailer directs the boat exactly where it needs to be, basically all you gotta do is get the bow between the bunks and then you can power it right up - as long as you don't miss the center of the bunks, which is really a hotdog & hallway situation, it will be perfect every time without issue.

Roller trailers on the other hand, the most minor screw up and you run the bow straight down a rough metal object and they adjust every which way so basically if the trailer isn't square w/ the waterline, or the boat goes up it listing, then that's how it ends up. They are only good for people who insist on pushing the boat onto the trailer gently by hand then cranking it up - this doesn't work very well in the current or wind.

Basically roller trailers are for pussies.
 

leaky

Vice Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
3,938
Likes
1,963
Location
NH
Oh water pumps - a lot of the newer engines need them frequently, like every season. Basically the old engines would just run cold most of the time, cooling systems not really well calibrated, so the water pumps & cooling systems were just hitting the problem with a sledge hammer and there was alot of tolerance built in for a worn pump. On an old engine you might go 5 years without noticing the difference. On the newer engines everything is all tuned with poppet valves, thermostats, and water pumps so that just the right pressure is made to keep them operating at the desired temperature range - all for emissions. There is less tolerance in these systems for a worn water pump, some specific pressure is required and if you don't make it then it can't overcome the restriction. I don't know E-Tec's but that 300 hour statement might be 1 year or 300 hours, water pump life depends on both because the fins take a set and create less pressure over time - the water pumps will come out looking like new but the new one will operate much differently.

Add to the trailer thoughts;

The other issue w/ roller trailers is the maintenance - you would not believe how expensive the bigger rollers are when you start loosing them. A lot of extra maintenance, my Riff Raff trailer was one of those ~150 roller setups when I first got it and the trailer was basically new at the time, total pain the ass. Was not an infrequent occurrence to be putting a new roller on on or taping something over the end of one of the brackets so it didn't gouge the boat.

Winches - very rarely does any trailer come with enough winch and it makes a huge difference. A lot of knock off ones are out there but most of them are garbage. Basically - budget $200 and you can get a decent Fulton 2 speed that will make everything easier.
 

MAArcher

Rear Admiral
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Posts
1,076
Likes
535
Age
50
Location
New England
Unless you insist on being super careful (slow) all the time loading, cranking the boat up, and feel it must roll off the trailer on it's own (versus just letting it float off) usually bunk trailers are a lot easier to deal with.

A well setup bunk trailer directs the boat exactly where it needs to be, basically all you gotta do is get the bow between the bunks and then you can power it right up - as long as you don't miss the center of the bunks, which is really a hotdog & hallway situation, it will be perfect every time without issue.

Roller trailers on the other hand, the most minor screw up and you run the bow straight down a rough metal object and they adjust every which way so basically if the trailer isn't square w/ the waterline, or the boat goes up it listing, then that's how it ends up. They are only good for people who insist on pushing the boat onto the trailer gently by hand then cranking it up - this doesn't work very well in the current or wind.

Basically roller trailers are for pussies.

What about shallow ramps? I like bunk trailers for simplicity, durability and lower cost, but a low slung roller trailer is sweet for getting in and out of shallow water. With rollers you can also have less of a need for a trailer with a long tongue.
 

leaky

Vice Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
3,938
Likes
1,963
Location
NH
What about shallow ramps? I like bunk trailers for simplicity, durability and lower cost, but a low slung roller trailer is sweet for getting in and out of shallow water. With rollers you can also have less of a need for a trailer with a long tongue.

Really splitting hairs there - basically if a ramp is shallow that means its relatively lacking pitch too. A roller trailer might grant you launching in a few less inches of water but its not night and day.

Even a bunk trailer you can tie off a cleat and pull the trailer out from under the boat.
 

novivin

Captain
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
660
Likes
286
Location
southcoast, MA
Really splitting hairs there - basically if a ramp is shallow that means its relatively lacking pitch too. A roller trailer might grant you launching in a few less inches of water but its not night and day.

Even a bunk trailer you can tie off a cleat and pull the trailer out from under the boat.
I would beg to differ. If he is looking to haul the boat to lots of ramps, with bad pitch or shallow waters, a roller rig might be worth it. I like bunks too, but own a roller trailer for versatility. My LoadRite5Starr is an 11, I have needed one new roller. I am almost to the point though that it might be better to buy a new rig altogether. My washer/pin/roller bearing replacement cost under 200 bucks, but next time my roller bunks will need replacement. So, figure potential 12 year life, if rinsed thoroughly like I do after uses. If you don’t rinse, you probably will cut that in half
 

novivin

Captain
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
660
Likes
286
Location
southcoast, MA
That said, when these roller bunks look sketchy, this trailer is going to become a bunk trailer, and if I hate it, it will go on sale and I will buy a roller trailer. Also, FWIW, my home ramp is a windy exposed hole. I have not destroyed my keel too bad, and use my boat a lot. All drive on, no pussy floats at my ramp. You gotta learn how to drive.
 

leaky

Vice Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
3,938
Likes
1,963
Location
NH
I would beg to differ. If he is looking to haul the boat to lots of ramps, with bad pitch or shallow waters, a roller rig might be worth it. I like bunks too, but own a roller trailer for versatility. My LoadRite5Starr is an 11, I have needed one new roller. I am almost to the point though that it might be better to buy a new rig altogether. My washer/pin/roller bearing replacement cost under 200 bucks, but next time my roller bunks will need replacement. So, figure potential 12 year life, if rinsed thoroughly like I do after uses. If you don’t rinse, you probably will cut that in half

In my case it was 8k+ of boat forced up them via 300 HP that would snap the pins on the ends and stuff, basically at times the rollers are getting pushed off real hard or crushed and cracked apart. Corrosion not the issue, brute force.

Let me put it this way - never have seen a ramp where I was comfortable putting a given boat into the water at, where a roller trailer would help much. Rollers only really help a boat slide, they don't get you much lower if at all. But I did also use your typical full blown saltwater ramps with my bigger trailer boats, Newburyport, Salisbury, Marshfield, Chatham, Biddeford, Saquatucket, etc
 

Old Mud

Admiral
Lite User
Joined
Sep 9, 2012
Posts
7,451
Likes
7,821
Age
81
Location
mid coast Maine
First Name
Don
Boat Make
Ho Made

novivin

Captain
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Posts
660
Likes
286
Location
southcoast, MA
That is a kick ass boat @MAArcher !
You will love that rig. It is a beast, but not one that will kill you trailering. Mine is a little smaller, but still a hell of a good seaworthy boat.
@leaky , I totally get your opinion now.
8K lbs of boat power loading on a roller trailer is not anything I would ever try! My rig is less than 2K. I am a wicked pussy going on but always get it there 90+ % of the time without touching metal at all. Judging wind and current are key. Always come in slow and steady and lean into the forces that center your approach and you are fine. When I can, I do use the float and crank it up to ease wear. @leaky is right!!! Make sure you get a heavy two speed wench on the trailer. A necessity.
 

leaky

Vice Admiral
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Posts
3,938
Likes
1,963
Location
NH
That is a kick ass boat @MAArcher !
You will love that rig. It is a beast, but not one that will kill you trailering. Mine is a little smaller, but still a hell of a good seaworthy boat.
@leaky , I totally get your opinion now.
8K lbs of boat power loading on a roller trailer is not anything I would ever try! My rig is less than 2K. I am a wicked pussy going on but always get it there 90+ % of the time without touching metal at all. Judging wind and current are key. Always come in slow and steady and lean into the forces that center your approach and you are fine. When I can, I do use the float and crank it up to ease wear. @leaky is right!!! Make sure you get a heavy two speed wench on the trailer. A necessity.

Haha you don't gotta respect my opinion or agree, half the time nobody does, but when a boat is up in that weight range the last thing you want to do is crank it as it's just real hard and it also basically just generates more stuff to break, smoothest operation was power it up then crank it the last 6 inches or so.

The trailer that one was on, they made an 8k and 10k model, difference was really just a 3rd axle but of course the previous owner had skimped out. I knew the axles were 4800 lb versions so didn't sweat it, was basically max load all the time but close to an intended range. Lots of weird stuff would break thought as a result - had to weld up a customer winch bracket after twisting the original to hell, leave springs snapping, had a leave spring hanger crack, cross member crack, sheered a bolt once and had others I found wearing thin. Eventually got everything all beefed up for the next guy but never again - if I ever go back to a heavier trailer boat going to make sure I'm a good 25% under the intended load or more.

Now I have my 32 Holland I'm trying to finish off and my 16 ft center console "skiff" - the skiff I push onto the bunks by hand, then I jump in and drive it up, lean over the bow and hook the winch up, few cranks to pull it on tight, shutdown and tilt the engine up, and it's a low stress done deal.
 

morgan1727

Commander
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Posts
338
Likes
73
What about shallow ramps? I like bunk trailers for simplicity, durability and lower cost, but a low slung roller trailer is sweet for getting in and out of shallow water. With rollers you can also have less of a need for a trailer with a long tongue.

I may be one of the few, but I loved my roller trailers. When we moved around there were just some ramps you can not get out of on a low tide with a bunk trailer. Biggest boat was a 25ft with twin 250s. On rare occasion we loaded the boat with all rollers out of the water, big strain on the winch but it got done. If we did not have the roller trailer would have had to wait around for a couple hours for enough water.
I can see however if you only launch once in a while and can pick your tides or the ramps you use always have enough water. Can also see the advantage of bunks if you have a heavy boat.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom